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Review

Michael Palmer: Showcase I'm Still Dancing

Dub Mixes by Peter Chemist are characterized by an unconventionally brittle aesthetic. Because Chemists output with just a handful Dub-LPs has remained quite manageable, here is a showcase album that he produced. You don't know for sure: Does the LP now have the title “Showcase” or is it just an indication that “I'm Still Dancing” is a showcase album? In any case, it is certain that the singer is not called Michael, as on the cover, but Michael Palmer. His first LP from 1983 had been wanted for a long time and rightly so, and could hardly be bought for less than a three-digit figure. Enriched with liner notes by John Masouri on an extra sheet, the record is now available in French, true to the original Iroko label. With the old cover including misprints, Limonious comic back side and without a bland barcode. Michael Palmer, born in 1960, had his first single “Mr. Landlord ”, but the tune only became successful on the Get In The Groove riddim after Sonia Pottinger recorded it again in 1980. From then on, Palmer became one of the acclaimed singers of the pre-digital Dancehall Foundation in recent years. He wasn't a dread, he saw himself as a roots reality singer. Palmer came from the “fiery hell” of Kingston 13 (Maxfield Park) and sang in the opener of his debut produced on Channel One: “Uptown people want to dance funky - people in the ghetto dance the waterpumpee. Uptown people dance electric boogie - people in the ghetto do the cool & deadly ”. The riddims came from the Roots Radics and were presumably recorded by Scientist. There is no other way of explaining how his name got on the cover. Because "I'm Still Dancing" is the work of Peter Chemist, whom Palmer specifically mentions in "Ghetto Dance". The sound of the production, with barely noticeable hihat and idiosyncratic echoes, also points to Peter Chemist. He's producing rough ones in an extraordinarily spartan way Dubs to the six vocaltunes. He mixes the party time riddim without a hihat with playful echoes and accents on the snare. "Ghetto Dub“Positions the drums with gated reverb effects around a distorted guitar theme. "Gwan Dub“Reduces the drum kit to a kick drum with underlaid snare echoes. Palmer continued his collaboration with Peter Chemist on his George Phang-produced, extremely successful follow-up album "Lick Shot", on the back of which he talks about his way of writing songs. Which makes the statement “all tracks written by Jah Thomas” on “I'm Still Dancing” seem questionable. Thomas had produced the album for his Midnight Rock label, but otherwise stayed out of it. He left the deejay part for a Greensleeves Maxi of the hit "Ghetto Dance (Babylon give wi a chance)" to Jim Brown, another Greensleeves Maxi with the title track from the LP and Robert French's "No War" on the B-side is due to the Peter Chemist Mixes a sought-after rarity that is worth every investment. The sonically convincing new edition of the LP attracts not only strong vocaltunes but also its unusual Dub-Style. (The slightly changed text first appeared in RIDDIM 02/21)

Rating: 4 out of 5.

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Five Star Review

Alborosie: Back-a-yard Dub

(This text has been machine translated.) It's Friday April 23rd and Alborosie's sixth dub album is out today. Let's not kid ourselves, the candidate has been chosen. "Back-a-yard Dub“ will hardly be able to be pushed from the pole position of this years Dub-Charts. Because it's not just grandiose sounding, modern old school Dub is in the tradition of real versions, but also an audio event that works on its own, which even without deejay, dancehall or sound system blows away everything that gets in its way with murderous waves. The album is the counterpart to the Wailing Souls LP "Back A Yard" released a few weeks ago, which Alborosie produced in his studio with a lot of Eighties fanfare, Simmons and synth drums. Flabba Holt from the Roots Radics played bass, Tyrone Downie from the Wailers played the keyboards. After the powerful old work of the Wailing Souls was in the can, Puppa Albo has the "Alborosie Dub Station "thrown on. It's his newest toy, a plug-in he developed that is able to reproduce the typical effects from King Tubby's studio. The reverb and the sound of the tubby tape echo are less spectacular, but very nice. Absolutely awesome, however, is the digital replica of the high pass filter. In combination with the variety of instruments of the Wailing Souls template and the Dubskills from Alborosie, the new effect board creates a monstrous spectacle. Assembled to an anarchic ping-pong excess full of reverb and filter effects that have never been heard before. Comparable to the force of sound of a Groucho Smykle. But he has to record additional keyboards to stage his wall of sound. Alborosie, on the other hand, benefits from the complexity of its production and packs for him Dub a few more felt dB on it. No matter what the people say, these sounds lead the way! His mix is ​​like a sales recommendation for the device he has developed, and initial reactions in social media are already showing that this plug-in will be able to use it in the near future Dub is mastered over a wide area. That the LP “Back-A-Yard Dub“Means - and means: back in Jamaica - and the packaging is reminiscent of the aesthetics of the old stamp print cover, not only alludes to the fact that alborosies are by chance Dub is created where it comes from. If there were 10 stars, this LP would get 15.

PS: When the text was written, no streaming links were yet activated. There are audio samples here. Or you trust the reviewer and get the LP straight away. Vinyl won't be around forever anyway.

Rating: 5 out of 5.
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Review

Raiders of the Lost Dub

In 1981, Indiana Jones began the hunt for the lost treasure, which not only caused a tremor in the cinema. In the same year, the booming one reacted Dubworld on the hype with "Raiders of the Lost Dub". It wasn't the first time that Dubinspired by Hollywood albums - just think of “Star Wars Dub"," Scientist & Jammys Strike Back "or the" Tough Guys "of the Fatman Riddim Section - but rarely has it been copied as brazenly as in this case. The cover artwork was a copy of the "Raiders Of The Lost Ark" soundtrack by John Williams, even the The lettering was identical. Island Records had approved the forgery, after all the vocal versions came from the Dubs from their greatest hits catalog. Burning Spears “Social Living” and I Jah Man's “Molding” had been pulled through the effect board by Karl Pitterson, “Man Next Door” in the version of the Paragons got one Dubtreatment by Steven Stanley. Sly & Robbie had produced and played six of the ten titles themselvesdubbt, including Junior Delgados “Fort Augustus” and “Guess Who's Coming To Diner” by Black Uhuru, who participated in the hunt with four songs. The album was shaped by the fact that the studio technology was no longer limited to four tracks and access was no longer limited to Dubben had become more variable as a result. The mixes looked correspondingly hard and modern when the LP was released in the same year as the film and soundtrack. As soon as it came, it disappeared again. It is said that legal issues with the cover meant that “Raiders of the Lost Dub“Has never been re-pressed. Music On Vinyl has the Brutal DeluxeDub-Adventure refreshed by a dust-free master and the LP reissued for the first time in almost 40 years with the original artwork. (The slightly changed text first appeared in RIDDIM 01/21)

Rating: 4 out of 5.

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Review

Dub Attack

For two short years, between 1979 and '80, that brought that originally to Bunny Lee ATTACK Label that already belonged to Trojan at the time, exorbitantly popping Maxis out, most of them recognizable by the logo highlighted in yellow, with red letters on a dark green background. In some cases the blue Trojan label was also used. There were a total of 25 pieces, most of which are in great demand today because of the mixes of Prince Jammy and Scientist that can be found here and only here. Including extended killer versions of Barry Brown's "Living As A Brother", "Separation" and "Cool Pon Your Corner", Morwell's "Kingston Twelve Tuffy", Linval Thompson's "Pop No Style" and Michael Rose's "Born Free". The picture with the labels of these maxis comes from the booklet of a strangely compiled one DoCDon which one, separated from the vocals, 19 of that attackDubs as - as the booklet calls it - finds “generous” bonus material. Including the previously mentioned titles. But there are two completely different hooks for the compilation Dub-Albums that absolutely do not match each other stylistically. On the one hand, “A.1 Dub", Mixed with Blacka Morwell in Kingston in 1980 Dubs for Morwell's 1979 LP “Cool Runnings” and mixing the “Taxi” and “Get In The Groove” riddims. On the other hand, “Cry Tuff Dub Encounter Chapter IV ”, the counterpart to Prince Far Is“ Voice Of Thunder ”, mixed a year later in London by Adrian Sherwood. Although the DoCD's liner notes endeavor to link the albums and both LPs are individually excellent, the Attack BonusDubt's the real reason this set is better not to be missed. Especially since you would have to invest significantly more money for each of these maxi than for the always inexpensive DoCDs from the English re-issue label Doctor Bird. (A shorter version of the text appeared in RIDDIM 01/21)

Rating: 4 out of 5.

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Review

Star Wars Dub

The hype about the empire will never stop. So Secret Records reissued it four years ago "Star Wars Dub" Burning Sounds LP re-pressed in "authentic" red vinyl. It is one of those sought after Dub LPs that Phil Pratt sold to the English label at the end of the 70s without any further information, the first presses of which always came in colorful vinyl. You hear that the tracks' home station was Channel One Studio and that Sly Dunbar was in the engine room. But you have to cruise through the Jamaican galaxy for a long time to come across originals like Jimmy London's “Ride On” or “Open The Gate” by Well Pleased & Satisfied. Difficult to say who mixed. Nevertheless, despite Darth Vader on the cover, liner notes dramatically flying past interesting facts and the occasional cracking of the pressure, you don't crash into the mixes. (An earlier version of the text appeared in RIDDIM 04/20)

Rating: 3 out of 5.

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Five Star Review

The Mikey Dread Show: African Anthem Dubwise

"Him don't steal, him don't gamble, talking 'bout man called Michael Campbell" it says at one point on the LP. Michael Campbell (1954 - 2008) alias Mikey Dread came to fame when he started a hugely successful radio show for the Jamaican Broadcasting Service (JBC) in 1976 after training as a radio and sound engineer, with which he spent four hours six days a week Midnight invented the reggae radio format. He was the first to go live on air in Sound System Style. After two years, Campbell fell out with JBC. He quit, founded the Dread At The Control (DATC) label, and began producing himself and others. The first LPs from 1979 copied both the principle and the title of his discontinued radio show: On the debut "Dread At The Controls" (aka "Evolutionary Rockers") Campbell presented himself as a mixture of MC and Deejay. Same with the successor "African Anthem Dubwise " then he not only succeeded in his best album ever, but also one of the most brilliant Dub LPs of all time. A monster of version culture that was essential to the European success story of the Dub contributed. The basis was two songs produced by Mikey Dread by Rod Taylor ("Behold Him" ​​+ "His Imperial Majesty") and Edi Fitzroy ("Country Man" + "Miss Molly") as well as five of his own tracks. The riddims were mixed by Prince Jammy in a night session at King Tubby and then shipped to London. There the Englishman Dave Hendley, who died in 2016 and who was close friends with Campbell and Jammy, dived on his short-lived cruise label “African Anthem Dubwise “appeared first, a truckload of jive talk, synth, sound and voice effects over the raw Dubs what gave them an archaic ferocity. In contrast to the over also made in Englanddubs with the Greensleeves albums by Scientist, the action was discussed with Mikey Dread or specifically ordered by him. He had given Hendley a prepared tape with Gimmix, all of which came from his radio show. Including many jingles such as “Oh my gosh, the music just turns me on”, “Riddim full of culture, ya” or “Brandnew - Good For You”, which became classics that were sampled a thousand times over. "African Anthem Dubwise “was last published 15 years ago in an extended deluxe version with a different - banal - cover. Music On Vinyl has re-released the LP in the original artwork, with a modern, bulbous and less shrill sound. It was first published in a limited edition of 1.000 numbered copies in blue vinyl, and on January 29.01.2020, 04 it will be available in black vinyl. Everything else there is to say about the record, Big Youth explains at the beginning of page two: “Who is the man who plays Roots Rock Reggae? Michael Campbell, the Dread at the control, to thrill your soul. Alright? Alright! "(The text first appeared in RIDDIM 20/XNUMX and has been updated.)

Rating: 5 out of 5.

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Review

Errol Brown: Culture Dub & Medley Dub

"Culture Dub & Medley Dub" are two wanted Dub Albums by Doctor Bird together with an amazing 25 bonuses, some of them extremely raredubs from the estate of the Treasure Isle label were packed onto a DoCD. All tracks were created after Sonia Pottinger bought the business from Duke Reid in 1974. They were mixed by Errol Brown, the Resident Engineer at Treasure Isle, whom Mrs. Pottinger took over. She hired Brown to produce Dubalbums that the duke had refused until then. After the success of the first "Treasure" and "Pleasure" Dub-LPs from Reid's back catalog, Mrs Pottinger wanted an album with versions of her own productions from 1968 to '71. In 1976 the LP “Medley Dub“, An album that - apart from a Japanese CD edition - was difficult to find for a long time. Most of the tracks on it are by the Melodians, including four medleys, two of which were made famous through voicings from Dennis Alcapone. To do this a Dub to Max Romeo's “Let The Power Fall For I”, the confusing “Swing & Dub“Means what was probably just a misprint. Because one Dub for the Melodians hit “Swing & Dime” is also available. The LP also contained Dubs on titles by Errol Dunkley and Ken Boothe. Doctor Bird has enriched the album with 15 rare single B-sides from the late 70s, some of which are characterized by harsh short reverb effects. Including versions of "Lick And Run" by Ruddy Thomas, "Stormy Weather" by Bobby Ellis, and "Wake Up Everybody", a soultune by Harold Melvin & The Blue Notes or Teddy Pendergrass, which OC Roberts covered in 1976 for Sonia Pottinger . Two years later, Errol Brown produced "Harder Than The Rest", the second album by Culture, who split from Joe Gibbs and signed a deal with Virgins sub-label Fontline. For the vocal trio as well as for Brown, the move to Treasure Isle turned out to be a stroke of luck. After completing the LP, he toured with them and began to make a name for himself as dubbender live engineer. Before that, despite the frontline deal, he had one of eight songs on the "Harder Than The Rest" album for Sonia Pottinger's label Dub Mixed LP released with two different covers. Doctor Bird chose the uninspired Jamaican high note variant, although the Afro motif of the English edition - with slaves, warriors and shamans - is one of the most expressive covers of the genre. After all, the drawing of the UK Sky Note label is photographed in the booklet, which is otherwise only partially convincing, as the liner notes offer more adulation than facts with barely legible mini letters. Data on the origins of the bonus tracks would have been more appropriate. Nevertheless, this collection, which comes up with 10 other single B-sides of the group on the second CD in addition to the Culture LP, is a cornucopia with a total of 43 mixes by an exceptional sound engineer who missed the due recognition at Treasure Isle, therefore closed in 1979 Tuff Gong switched and Bob Marley became a live engineer. (The text first appeared in RIDDIM 04/19)

Rating: 4 out of 5.