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Five Star Review

Paul Fox: Dub B

Winchester UK based singer and producer Paul Fox is here at Dubblog a wrongly almost blank slate. The Roots, Reggae and Dub Artist has been releasing music under his own name since 1992 and has worked with many well-known artists and producers. The list of artists who have been in the studio with Paul Fox includes such illustrious names as: Nick Manasseh, Robert Tribulation, Michael Rose, Rod Taylor, Fullness, Dubheart, Jonah Dan, Brother Culture and Alpha & Omega, with whom Paul Fox also toured Europe in 2008. His sound was heavily influenced by Jah Shaka, Nick Manasseh, Jah Observer and Aba Shanti. He was so impressed by their music and vibes that in the late 1980s he began experimenting with a four-track recorder at home in private. It was with Julian Ryan, a friend and musician who introduced him to Jonah Dan, that he first tried his hand at reggae and Dub. Percussionist Jonah Dan had a small studio in west London and the three met regularly every week to record roots reggae and related Dubs from it. After releasing recordings together under the project name "Shades of Black" for a few years, they parted ways in the early 2000s and each went into business for himself by founding his own studio. In the meantime, more than 50 albums have been released on which Paul Fox appeared, be it as a producer, sound engineer or singer.

I haven't mentioned it yet, but I've been paying more attention to Paul Fox for a long time - also because of his immensely pleasant voice. I was all the more amazed that I was able to see the release of his two current albums "SameBlood"And"Dub B“ I literally overslept from last December. From everything I've heard from Paul Fox so far, "Dub Blood" can undoubtedly be counted among his best recordings. Paul's soft voice floats again and again through the room and evaporates in melodic, dubbig soundscapes. The sound is vaguely reminiscent of Jah Shaka, but also Mad Professor - so more English Dub par excellence. I don't want to mention every track explicitly, because each one has its own special appeal. I would just like to highlight my very personal favorite as Primus inter Pares. "Living in a Dub Zone", the counterpart to "Warzone Part Two Refugees" from the song album "Same Blood". Starting with the fine sound of an Arabic oud or Turkish saz and really rich binghi drums, the lyric leads us throughout the song: "Still wondering if all of these wars gonna cease - still wondering if I'm ever gonna live to see peace". and explosive sounds of war in the middle of the current situation in Eastern Europe, ie Ukraine. Of course, the theater of war could rather reflect the fatal situation in Syria, because arabesque sounds can be found at several points on the album. It doesn't matter, the song grabs me with full force every time.
I would like to mention one more thing, the attentive listener will also appreciate the wonderful binghi drumming on “Burning Dub' and 'Soon is the Dub“ not to be missed. In general, I really like the percussions on all the tracks on the album. "Dub Blood" takes a musical turning point in the middle of the album, because the rest of the tracks sound slightly symphonic from there.

Conclusion: It has been a long time since such a nice, up-to-date “RootsDub-Album". In my opinion the best album of 2022 so far.

Rating: 5 out of 5.
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Review

Ras Red I: Gweithredu Dub

Should someone tell me that you shouldn't be influenced by packaging. If there had been a comic (Wimmel) picture by Tony McDermott on the album, I would have noticed this oeuvre much earlier. Unfortunately, on the present album, only a "Monchhichi"-like being with very red eyes is emblazoned in front of a sound system. I was way too old for Monchhichis in the early 80s. Today I stumbled across this completely overlooked album again because of the Welsh word 'Gweithredu' (action). As you can easily see above, we are talking about Ras Red I: Gweithredu Dub. If the creature depicted is to stylize Ras Red I (read "Red Eye"), then he obviously consumed finest sativa landrace that gave his creativity a real kick-start. Russell Squire, that's the name of the multi-instrumentalist, producer and Dubmaster from Taunton, a town in the county of Somerset in south-west England. With "Gweithredu Dub“ he has put together a retrospective that can undoubtedly be seen as a homage to the heyday of reggae in the late 1970s and early 1980s.
Ras Red I is no stranger to England and his Dub-Workshops are no longer a secret in the county of Somerset. He is also committed to the survival of the oldest language spoken on the island, Welsh (Cymru > English Wales).
The present album is a mixture of own compositions that were recorded almost alone and remixed and some Ras Red I favorites that were created with other artists in their own studio over the past four years. I really like "Swine", a reference to George Orwell's Animal Farm, by One Style MDV (MDV = Many Different Variations). One Style MDV is a band of African origins from London with over 30 years of British Reggae roots and always reminds me slightly of Misty in Roots. At least in terms of their output, they are very similar to Misty in Roots.

With his own Dub-Tracks and the Dub-Remixes by some guest artists, this album shows Ras Red I as a promising grassroots-Dub Artist. For the very relaxed mix, the master preferred to have a bit of an indica variation, because "Gweithredu Dub' instead of 'action' exudes a cosily warm laid back feeling. Exactly what makes a relaxed evening.

Rating: 4 out of 5.
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Review

Sylvan Morris & Harry J: Cultural Dub

I've been looking for almost an eternity to find a pretty rare album, which also navigates under false flags.
When we here in Dubblog of sound engineers, basically the same names always come up. One person who is always – and quite wrongly – forgotten in this happy dance is Sylvan Morris. He was at home in almost every studio in Jamaica. Morris began his work as a mixing/sound engineer at the tender age of 17 in the Dynamics Studio, where he stayed for about two years. After a short interlude in Duke Reid's Treasure Isle Studio, he hired Clement Dodd for six years in Studio One. where Sylvan Morris put his unmistakable stamp on the typical Studio One sound. He is still considered the best engineer to ever sit at the mixing desk at 13 Brentford Road (Studio One). According to his own statement, Sylvan Morris was all in one person during his time at CS Dodd: electrical engineer, consultant, arranger, sound engineer and mixer. CS Dodd was only personally responsible for the payment and it was precisely for this reason that Sylvan Morris left Studio One to take up his new workplace at Harry J on Roosevelt Avenue in Kingston. It was the mid 1970's and Harry J Studio was one of the main hubs for the best Jamaican artists around at the time. Well over a thousand songs, some of them incomparable, were created during Sylvan Morris' 16-year tenure at Harry J Studio. Just a few classics to remember: Bob Marley: "Natty Dread" and "Rastaman Vibration", The Heptones: "Cool Rasta", Augustus Pablo: "Ital Dub' and 'Earth Rightful Ruler', The Royal Rasses: 'Vortex Dub', Burning Spear: 'Dry & Heavy', 'Marcus' Children' and 'Man In The Hills'. Oh yes, while we're on the subject of Burning Spear, the original Living Dub Vol. 1 and Vol. 2" - two of my undisputed favorite records - and also "Dub D'sco Vol. 1 and Vol. 2" by Bunny Wailer were also gilded by Sylvan Morris and thus unforgettable.
Back to my opening sentence: When Sylvan Morris opened up at Harry J Studio in 1974, the "Dubthing" just really going on. Ergo, there are also a few lesser-known ones by Sylvan Morris Dub- Albums under his own name: "Morris On Dub"(1975),"reggae workshop' (1977) and 'Consulting Dub" published. Published in 1978, “Cultural DubI find the most varied of all three. It starts with the eight-minute “Neighbour Dub' with toastings from the uncredited Big Youth & Ras Midas. After the Big Youth Toast, the album transitions into a showcase mix, before ending with a Ras Midas toast. "Hearts Of Dub“ features the unforgettable and also unmentioned I Roy and the Harry J Allstars sound like the revolutionaries here. For the third track, the rocksteady evergreen "Rivers Of Babylon" was re-recorded with the melodians, which was again converted into a classic Dubpart to end with a delightful toast of the "mighty poet I Roy" (quote: LKJ). Showcase albums were really hot in the making of this album. Back in the early '70s, Harry J produced a version of Breakfast In Bed starring Sheila Hilton. Sylvan Morris quickly turned it into the “Breakdown Dub“. And the journey of discovery continues: “World Of Dub“ is originally called “What Kind Of World” and comes from the Cables from the old Studio One days. In "Undermind Dub' comes the voice of John Holt. Originally by Alton Ellis, Can I Change My Mind was produced by CS Dodd in 1968. The crowning, unfortunately far too brief conclusion of this retrospective is a Perryesque “Cultural Dub“ with Joe White on the melodica, fat fan and unusually many sound effects.

My conclusion: Whenever I listen to such albums again after many years, I realize that it is still this warm, organic music that always captivates and enchants me. There they are, those immortal basslines that are far too often missing from today's recordings and so sorely missed by us old hands. In retrospect, with “Cultural Dub" a creative cross section through the creative phases of Sylvan "The Genius" Morris. The deeper I dig into Sylvan Morris' work, the more obvious it becomes how immensely important this man behind the mixing desk was for the entire development of reggae and Dub was/is.

Rating: 4 out of 5.
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Five Star Review

Ambient Warrior: Dub Journey's

Now we have further proof that our fine little sub-genre Dub is timeless and limitless. The Australian Isle of Jura label has proved this with the official new edition of an extremely unusual DubAlbums by Ambient Warrior: Dub Journey's, which was originally released in 1995 on the English label Lion Inc. The album is basically deep in the Dub rooted, but uses a much broader spectrum, which equally absorbs the most diverse musical influences and styles from all over the world and combines them into these wonderful soundscapes. The concept for Ambient Warrior was created as a side project for Ronnie Lion and Andreas Terrano. Ronnie Lion, who is not entirely unknown, noticed pretty quickly during the recording that Andreas Terrano is a very talented guitarist and keyboardist, and so the two quickly agreed to create an oeuvre that reflects the diverse musical influences of both protagonists. Andrew is z. B. Italian, Armenian and Russian descent what on Dub Journey's is unmistakably expressed. Insiders know Ronnie Lion from Brixton as the label owner from the beginnings of the British neo-Dub.

Since the earliest Dubtry from King Tubby, Lee Scratch Perry, Augustus Pablo, Prince Jammy and whatever their names are, we know that good one Dub must touch you deep down. That's why Ronnie Lion's slogan: "This is Ambient Warrior...coming to You from the Heart", presented in a distinctive voice (Dennis Rootical) reminiscent of Prince Far I, takes me from the start on (m)an unforgettable pilgrimage to Kailash. (Kailash: The Tibetans regard it as the holiest mountain, it is worshiped by Hindus, Buddhists and Bon, it is the headwaters of the four largest rivers of the Indian subcontinent.) Excuse me, Kailash? Yes, because these typical sounds of the Tibetan prayer bells are omnipresent and ring out again and again. The album is cast in one piece and gives me a pleasantly warm, meditative mood. Andreas Terrano weaves very soft guitar solos and synthesizer/keyboard sounds together into wonderful soundscapes. What was very good for the album's versatility is also due to the fact that many musicians of different genres and instruments were involved in the recordings. In addition to South American elements such as tango and bossa nova (Eastern Dub; cajun Dub); we also hear harp (Cajun Dub), Russian accordion (Bayan; Southern Dub), vibraphone and jaw harp (The Good, the Bad and the Dub).

My quintessence of the album is: Great Dub-Albums creep up on you very slowly. You can play them once and they're "quite nice". Play it umpteen times and very slowly a picture forms: small details emerge, the spirit of the Dub and the bliss of repetition make their way into your soul.

It's nice that there are still labels that make it their business to make such extremely rare, unique ones Dub-To save sounds from oblivion. Therefore, for the Ambient Warrior re-release, Isle of Jura gets: Dub Journey's albums six stars out of five from me.

Rating: 5 out of 5.
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Review

I Neurologici: I Neurologici

At high tide Dub-Albums to us Dub-Nerds overrun almost every day, treasures are often overlooked that deserve to be examined more closely. For this reason I like to go for a foray through my archive from time to time and usually find what I am looking for. This is what happened to "I Neurologici" one Dub-Collective from Rome, which since its founding in 1995 and phases of trying out, the cornerstones of their music, a melange of roots reggae, Dub with minor ethnic influences, created. The present album "I Neurologici“Was recorded in 1999 and brought to the people as a mini edition of 500 LPs in a timely manner. Sixteen years later "I Neurologici" was remastered and the album pimped up with some "alternate mixes".
Already the first track "440 Hz" is completely convincing and immediately hooked me with its rolling bassline. “SpaziAl Roots” starts spartan with bass and keyboard, until majestic flute sounds by Alessandro Mazzioti join in and create a hazy soundscape that is not entirely unlike some of Lee Perry's “far out moments”. Followed by “Boleto”, a variation on Maurice Ravel's “Bolero”, which briefly has a few punk rhythms in the middle that are reminiscent of the early Bad Brains. I could now discuss each track individually, because each has its own special charm, but that would go beyond the scope here. One more thing should be emphasized: Alessandro Mazziotti's transverse flute runs like a red thread through the recordings and the opulent use of DubEffects create a rich, bass-laden psychedelic.

In conclusion, it only remains to point out that the album “fer umme”, as the man from Palatinate says, is available for free. "I Neurologici" are still active today and worked with Zion Train last year.

Rating: 4 out of 5.
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Review

Tsadqan: Dub Meditation

If you are only a little interested in reggae, you cannot avoid typical Nyahbinghi chants. My first contacts with Nyahbinghi Songs were actually “Rastaman Chant” by Bob Marley & The Wailers, followed by Bunny Wailer's “This Train”, Cultures “So long Babylon a fool I”, IJahman's “Zion Hut”, Bob Marley's “Babylon System” and of course albums by Ras Michael (Dadawah) and the parade copy par excellence: Count Ossie & The Mystic Revelation of Rastafari “Grounation”. Even Jimmy Cliff opened his 1980s concerts with the Nyahbinghi Chant "Bongo Man".
The style of music that Rasta and percussionist Oswald Williams alias Count Ossie, who died in 1976, created together with The Mystic Revelation of Rastafari from its early beginnings in the late 1950s to the groundbreaking milestone “Grounation” (1973) and beyond, that is still today The foundation of "Kings Music", i.e. roots reggae.
The Nyahbinghi seances, also called Reasonings or Grounations, exerted an enormous influence on almost all Jamaican musicians, from Prince Buster, Rico, Cedric "IM" Brooks, Tommy McCook to Bob Marley and many other Foundation Artists. Even Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones, an outspoken reggae fan, is enthusiastic about the classic Nyahbinghi sound and therefore produced two albums for the Wingless Angels - a group around Justin Hinds - in the early 1990s. Almost every music lover in the world has known at least one Nyahbinghi song since 1993, namely "Oh Carolina" in the version of Shaggy. Produced by Prince Buster in 1958 with the Folkes Brothers and Count Ossies Afro combo, the original was released in 1960.

Nyahbinghi is derived from an East African territorial movement that opposed European imperialism and was active in various African states from 1850 to 1950. This movement also inspired many Jamaicans to oppose British colonialism in the 50s. This music then got its name from Jamaica and became the musical pillar of the Rasta religion and its followers.

Let's get to the actual project of "Tsadqan: Dub Meditation", the Dub-Album to "The Tsadiq Nyahbinghi". The current album takes us far back in time when the Nyahbinghi style was brought to life. The classical instrumentation: Thunder, Funde and Repeater or also called Kete, was combined to unique melodies by means of an electric bass, sparingly used guitar solos and keyboard interludes. This created a beautiful new mix in which tradition and modern times merge into a unique atmosphere. "Dub Meditation ”contains twelve tracks, two per track Dubs, in classic NyahbinghiDub-Style. The first ten tracks were discreet by Nick Manasseh, who is not unknown here, in his new London studio, that is to say: without major ones DubGimmicks, mixed. The last two tracks on the album are two unreleased bonus tracks from the opus "Shakaroot meets Tsadqan" and here Petah Sunday was allowed to show his mixing talent. The first ten tracks are unreleased Dub-Cuts from the 2020 album "Tsadqan - The Tsadiq Nyahbinghi", which have been withheld until now and only played in a few live performances.

Those who get involved in this typical, unadulterated sound will experience the meditative effect on their own body and rise into the air and glide like on the wings of an eagle. The sound is truly back to the Cradle of Roots Music made in Basel, Switzerland.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.
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Five Star Review

KMFDM: In Dub

There is music that literally makes you sit up and take notice. A few weeks ago my daughter asked whether I "KMFDM: In Dub“(Metropolis Records) would know; I absolutely have to listen to the album once - after tons of heavy sounds from early childhood, she knows her "old man" too well. And what shall I tell you? The “In Dub“Is one of those again Dub- Curiosities that have always cast a spell on me.

KMFDM was founded in 1984 by Sascha "Käpt'n K" Konietzko as a performance art project in Hamburg, moved its headquarters to Chicago in 1991 and has been successful in industrial metal / industrial rock for over 36 years. None other than the ON .U sound mastermind Adrian Sherwood, who has been exploring the endless possibilities of the Dub-Musik, produced the KMFDM album "Don't Blow Your Top" in 1988 and continued with its mixture of industrial, rock, Dub creative standards again.

About the album itself, “Käpt'n K” said in an interview: “The idea of ​​a Dub-Making a plate had been brewing for a number of years. I just never found the time to sit down and tackle the project. Some of my earliest musical influences were Dub and reggae and I did the project really old school. The dismantling of the original tracks and the brass arrangements were a lot of fun for me. In doing so, I found out that songs are at 125 BPM too dubben is not so ideal. It worked best with the slow and really fast tracks. ”That sounds very interesting. So I got down to the album and delved into the matter. “Käpt'n K” has reinterpreted twelve songs that span their entire career. Already after the first full rimshot on the snare at "Dub Light “I knew that this was an album to my liking. I would never have dreamed that this groovy and rocking source material would be so skillfully integrated Dubcostume transfer. Lucia Cifarelli sings “Everything Old Is New Again” on “Real Dub Thing ”and thus perfectly defines the power of“ In Dub". KMFDM hymns are reinterpreted and garnished with a hodgepodge of meditative grooves with groovy guitar passages, high-pitched horns, intense organ sounds and heavy bass lines, as on “A Dub Against War "," Hau Dub"," Bumaye "presented. With “Bumaye” I mean to hear a sequence with Nina Hagen's voice.
All in all, an album that is bursting with ideas and yet Dubheads will polarize. Quote from a fan: “My girlfriend likes reggae, but KMFDM not so much. Now she likes KMFDM too ”. For ON .U Sound Addicts from the very beginning, “KMFDM: In Dub“An easy exercise and access to those seldom heard sounds may be a little easier.

Rating: 5 out of 5.
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Five Star Review

Gladiators: The Time Is Now Discomixes

The Gladiators are undoubtedly a veteran of reggae history and their musical roots can be traced back to Clement “Sir Coxsone” Dodd's Studio One. My first encounter with their music was only in the mid-1970s. Their then producer Tony Robinson had made a deal in Europe and so the first (regular) albums of the Gladiators appeared on Virgin Records. Albert Griffiths died on December 15.12.2020, 74 at the age of XNUMX after a long illness of Parkinson's. The head of the trio with classic harmony vocals à la Wailers, Culture, Abyssinians, Israel Vibration, Meditations, Mighty Diamands etc. has the appearance of the "Gladiators: The Time Is Now Discomixes“(Tabou1) and I can imagine that he was very happy with the end result. Dartanyan "GreenLion" Winston, a young American sound tinkerer in his early 30s from Ohio, has chosen a few tracks from the almost inexhaustible repertoire of the Gladiators and created wonderfully classic discomixes. Eight original songs are skilfully deconstructed and reconstructed with a ton of energy, studio and mixer magic. Dartanyan "GreenLion" Winston pulls out all the stops and delivers a wonderfully sparkling sound bath of vocals, echo, reverb and delay. My highlights, the eight-minute title, are: "Fussing and Fighting" - a Marley song that most clearly shows how much Albert Griffiths' voice resembled Bob Marley's - and "Dreadlocks your Time is now" of course. The album cover gives the impression that it was created under the influence of psychoactive or even more hallucinogenic substances in the hippie era. Even if I had made a slightly different selection of songs, “The Time Is Now Discomixes” is, in retrospect, a wonderful homage to the wonderful gladiators who, undeservedly, were always a bit off the side of the really big vocal trios.

Rating: 5 out of 5.
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Review

Prince Hendrik and the Other Members of The Royal Family: Aquadub

Already as a child he was crazy about music and as a teenager he was fascinated by the magical sound of reggae and ska. For this reason he flew to Jamaica to the roots of reggae at the age of twenty, where he lived for two years from 1989 to 1991, married a Jamaican woman and fathered a daughter. The 52-year-old Hendrik “Prince Hendrik” van Houten from Arnhem says about his time and life on the Caribbean island: “I was young and very receptive to everything. I lived in Rasta communes, learned a lot about Rasta philosophy and Nyahbinghi drumming. My stay there had a very positive impact on me. "
In the mid-1990s, Prince Hendrik arrived as a single father in the Arnhem artists' quarter Klarendal and built his “Kitchenrock home studio”, a multitrack recording and mixing studio, in his house. Since 2012, three albums have been released on CD under the name “Prince Hendrik and the Other Members of The Royal Family” and now “Aquarius / Aquadub“(A Sky High Underground Production) re-released in limited and numbered edition of 300 copies on vinyl.
“Two friends I have known all my life and with whom I used to be in bands play along. One on drums and bass, the other as guitarist and cellist. I take care of the vocals, keyboards and the recording process myself, ”says van Houten and continues:“ For me, sun and beach are not inextricably linked with reggae. I have nothing to do with the party variant of reggae and even less with dancehall and raggamuffin. The latter often glorifies aggression and hatred. ”So almost everything has been said about the reggae style of Prince Hendrik and his friends. We are offered a kind of relaxed, handmade “underground reggae” - as Prince Hendrik himself describes his style. I involuntarily associate “underground reggae” with the early, sometimes Spartan but always highly interesting ones Dub-Work of a Keith Hudson. “Aquadub“Both vocally and stylistically. On “Aquadub“There is no sound too much, every instrument and every small one Dub-Effect gets its space and enough time to develop in the ear. I especially liked the cello, which occasionally comes up with small but fine melodies surrounded by a beautiful guitar sound. A chance find of honest, handmade music that I would like to recommend to everyone.

Rating: 4 out of 5.
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Five Star Review

Lee Scratch Perry meets Daniel Boyle: To drive the Dub Starship through the Horror Zone

I often find myself asking: "How would Jim Morrison, Jimi Hendrix, Bob Marley and many more sound today if they hadn't died much too early?" This question comes to mind when I hear Lee "Scratch" Perry. No, no, thank god Scratch is still alive. But what if Lee “Scratch” Perry hadn't slipped into an increasingly unpredictable, depressive, and destructive phase in the late 1970s that ended up with the flaring of his Black Ark studio in Washington Gardens, Kingston? How would albums from Black Ark Studio sound like today? Fortunately, there is an Adrian Maxwell Sherwood and a Daniel Boyle who still have the ability to inspire this man, who is well over 80 years old, to top performance.

Maxwell Livingston Smith alias Max Romeo produced his masterpiece in the Black Ark as early as 1976 together with Lee Perry and the Upsetters - a massive mountain range that is still visible today in the vast Reggae landscape. Almost 40 years after "Was in Babylon"In 2015 Max Romeo, Daniel Boyle, Lee" Scratch "Perry and three great Upsetters published another collaboration:"Horror Zone". “Horror Zone” is by no means a cheap copy of “War ina Babylon”, but rather a successful connection to old times, so more of a kind of further development. That was the case with the vocal album "Horror Zone" DubAlbum in good old fashion already with. And what's next? After this "Lee Scratch Perry meets Daniel Boyle to drive the Dub Starship through the Horror Zone“Was already released in 2020 in a limited vinyl edition for Record Store Day, now that follows Dub Album of the Dub Albums in digital form. Boyle and Perry have the original "Horror Zone" -Dubs subjected to another processing on the mixer and refined a cosmos with tons of cave-like reverb and analog special effects, which according to credits Lee "Scratch" Perry is attributed. Once again we are convincingly heard that it is not a challenge for Perry & Boyle, an already good one Dub-Mix album one more time because these two Dubmasters are always able to go one better. The result can be more than heard, because the two have an intergalactic, dubcreate a wise supernova that shines the entire galaxy even brighter than the original.
Daniel Boyle's Rolling Lion Studio produced, recorded and mixed exclusively with analog devices from the 50s to the 80s and the characteristic Black Ark sound, which is understandably not 100% achieved. Nonetheless, I'm pretty sure that “Lee Scratch Perry meets Daniel Boyle to drive the Dub Starship through the Horror Zone ”will be a new classic in Lee“ Scratch ”Perry's overall / life's work.

Rating: 5 out of 5.