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Review

I Neurologici: I Neurologici

At high tide Dub-Albums to us Dub-Nerds overrun almost every day, treasures are often overlooked that deserve to be examined more closely. For this reason I like to go for a foray through my archive from time to time and usually find what I am looking for. This is what happened to "I Neurologici" one Dub-Collective from Rome, which since its founding in 1995 and phases of trying out, the cornerstones of their music, a melange of roots reggae, Dub with minor ethnic influences, created. The present album "I Neurologici“Was recorded in 1999 and brought to the people as a mini edition of 500 LPs in a timely manner. Sixteen years later "I Neurologici" was remastered and the album pimped up with some "alternate mixes".
Already the first track "440 Hz" is completely convincing and immediately hooked me with its rolling bassline. “SpaziAl Roots” starts spartan with bass and keyboard, until majestic flute sounds by Alessandro Mazzioti join in and create a hazy soundscape that is not entirely unlike some of Lee Perry's “far out moments”. Followed by “Boleto”, a variation on Maurice Ravel's “Bolero”, which briefly has a few punk rhythms in the middle that are reminiscent of the early Bad Brains. I could now discuss each track individually, because each has its own special charm, but that would go beyond the scope here. One more thing should be emphasized: Alessandro Mazziotti's transverse flute runs like a red thread through the recordings and the opulent use of DubEffects create a rich, bass-laden psychedelic.

In conclusion, it only remains to point out that the album “fer umme”, as the man from Palatinate says, is available for free. "I Neurologici" are still active today and worked with Zion Train last year.

Rating: 4 out of 5.
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Five Star Review

High Tone Meets Zenzile: Zentone, Chapter 2

One has to state: Corona also has its good! These two (!) Albums, namely: High Tone Meets Zenzile - Zentone, Chapter 2 (Jarring Effects). What a brilliant one Dub-Plant! Emerging from the most depressing of all pandemics, fifteen years after "Chapter 1". Apparently the nine musicians have the two most prominent ones Dub-Bands of France could not stand it any longer in the loneliness of their home offices and locked themselves in a studio in Lyon for a week, unbelievably, to make music with each other face to face. Without a lot of studio rocket science (in contrast to "Chapter 1"). Instead with a simple sound system setting, spontaneous, direct and improvised. All that mattered was the interpersonal vibe. The result is breathtaking. Two albums full of fantastic, inspired compositions with a total of 22 tracks that are bursting with warmth, intensity and real beauty. The catalyst of this quality was apparently the pure pleasure in personal encounters - perhaps paired with a few musical ideas from everyone involved during the lockdowns. Substance instead of effect was the motto. All tracks were produced live and then mixed on analog consoles. The sound is warm, complex and full of dynamics. Everything is just right here. And of course the inclusion of singers fits in with such an approach. Yes indeed! I am actually Dub-Purist, but here Nai-Jah, Nazamba, Jolly Joseph and Rod Taylor make an absolutely essential contribution to the musical diversity, without sacrificing the Dub-Vibe to belittle even the slightest. Her performances - especially nai-jahs and nazambas - are simply terrific.

Okay, but now I have to deal with the two Albums are cleared up: Zenzile and High Tone recorded a total of ten rhythms during their week in Lyon. Zenzile then pre-decapitated all ten pieces, mixed them and put them together into an album, which can be bought as a CD or download. High Tone, on the other hand, only took on the four rhythms for which a singer was recorded and presented them in showcase style: vocal version, instrumental version, DubVersion - and thus comes to twelve tracks, which are offered as double vinyl (but they can also be purchased as a download). But to complicate things nicely, there is one more thing Streaming variant. This consists of the ten Zenzile mixes and the four vocal versions of High Tone. Understood?

real Dub-Nerds will of course compare the mixes with each other and find that High Tone goes to work more traditionally and aims at the use of sound systems with its mixes, while Zenzile tends to take a more playful, sofa-compatible approach. But I can't decide which one I like better - that's why I always listen to both albums one after the other.

Rating: 5 out of 5.
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Review

Kanka: My Bubble

Bass is the base of Dub! A fact that is as simple as it is evident. Sure: Bass is of course not everything (but everything is in the Dub nothing without bass!). But bass is - at least for me - at least fifty percent of what I wear Dub love. Everything else has to share the remaining percent. And that's why I'm a fan of Kanka, that humble French one Dub-Nerds who regularly offer their music for free download. Kanka is THE man of the bass. Apart from Alpha & Omega, I don't know anyone Dub-Artist who produces bass lines that weigh tons like him. In his music, bass is the all-pervading dark matter. Everything exists IN the bass, not next to it, above or below it. The bass is all encompassing. Well is with "My Bubble" his new album was released. I advise you to listen to it on a good hi-fi system - preferably with a voluminous subwoofer - to enjoy the massage of the bowels and not to switch off even if the structural engineer called for emergency repairs is already in the door. Of course, it is even better to experience Kanka in a live sound system. The little man stands in stoic calm behind his mixer, his gaze never lifts into the audience, he never speaks a word. But the music that he sends through the loudspeaker towers makes the earth shake. The title of the album, "My Bubble", makes it clear that only we hardcoreDub-Nerds who are Kanka's target audience. We who are in one with him Dub- Stuck the filter bubble and know how to enjoy this kind of music. I admit that his music has no sophistication, that it does not contain any fresh ideas and borders on less complexity. For free. But I appreciate what comes from doing without all these ingredients: An absolute focus on the essentials: bass & rhythm. The effect is mesmerizing. A trance ride through the depths of dark matter. The album is included odgprod.com for free download.

Rating: 4 out of 5.

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Review

Roots organization: Stricktly Recreational

I've said it so often: “Instrumental reggae is a gigantic, supranational, omnipresent over-hype!” Honestly! Here we have another perfect example of that: "Stricktly Recreational" from the Roots Organization. And again, this wind-driven, brilliant work comes from the Alps - like the last "Winds of Matterhorn". But unlike the winds, the root organization is located more in the sound spectrum of jazz - whatever sounds a bit like Ska, although the EP is free of corresponding rhythms. As a producer, aDUBta responsible. He recorded the nine-member band live in the stress studio in Graz - which helps to explain the sound. Since I play brass in reggae and especially in Dub I like the EP very much and can also do a lot with their solos. The sound is airy, the arrangements extremely varied and the tempo lively. The mix even conveys a little discreetly from time to time Dub-Appeal. Nice.

Rating: 4 out of 5.
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Review

Dubinator: Police in Helicopter

Regular readers of the dubblogs.de and listeners of the "deep in dub“-Playlist on Spotify, I'm (hopefully) an advocate of the classic style of Dubs, based on roots reggae that is kept as minor as possible. This does not mean the groundbreaking recordings from the 1970s and 1980s; rather, corresponding new productions are close to my heart - especially because of the better / further developed sound and the new technical and resulting artistic possibilities. And yet there are always exceptions to my favorite scheme: sound, bassline and Dub-Technique is right, there are always musical "aha" experiences and wonderful sample and sound surprises - but it's not roots reggae.

This review is about such an exceptional album: "Police in helicopter“(Echo Beach) from barely appeared except for one EP that was not so successful Dubinator. Who is behind this moniker and how he was musically socialized would be interesting, but eludes any research - the label itself keeps a low profile, so we shouldn't be interested in it either. The focus is anyway Dubinator's music, and the - dare I say it? - definitely reminds me of the work of Lee Scratch Perry and allows speculation about how he might sound today if he had continued his career as a producer. 

For many readers, this comparison will be tantamount to sacrilege (if not blasphemy!) - but listen to the album with an open mind and parallels to Perry's more obscure tracks - for example from the fine compilation "Arkology“- reveal themselves. Here, as there, the use of audio snippets as an effect is essential; what is engine noise or the mooing of a cow at LSP comes with Dubinator in an unbelievable variety of samples. So entertainment is provided; With “Police in Helicopter” there is a lot to discover, even after listening to it often: The helicopter flies once across the ear canal, sirens wail, an alien orchestral flourish flashes again and again, a rainmaker gently trickles down. In places a soprano choir seems to hold a single note, a woman lectures (presumably) about globalization, etc. etc. Please note: All of this and more happens in the first, title-giving track. 

An album like a surprise bag: you hardly even know what comes out; musically it moves through a variety of styles that incorporate elements of reggae and Dub-Techniques are held together. In addition, the Dubinator does not deny a certain inclination towards the dance floor, although he can also come up with intellectual nourishment - that is, literary recordings by Alan Moore, William S. Burroughs or Yello's Dieter Meier. Other contributors: Dub Pistols' Seanie T, bass legend Doug Wimbish, Max Romeo, Dubmatix, Rob Smith, Sly & Robbie as well as the B-52's in the form of fine samples. 

And so “Police in Helicopter” has become an astonishingly diverse album for which the Dubinator may have sampled across the back catalog of the Echo Beach label, including reminiscences Dubblestandart, On-U Sound and Lee Scratch Perry. So if you are interested and have leisure, this release sends you on a wonderfully astonishing journey of discovery, which is particularly worthwhile for reggae enthusiasts.

Finally, the very successful album illustration remains to be mentioned - a contemporary adaptation of the “They Harder They Come” cover, where you can take a closer look to perceive and enjoy the supposedly subtle differences. I enjoy it and it is certainly one of the reasons why “Police in Helicopter” deserves a very good rating as an overall package.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.
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Review

DJ Drez: Good Crush Dub Sessions

Dub, felt slower than slow, sparsely instrumented and in between the feeling of much empty space. You can like that, but you don't have to. I decided on the former and DJ Drez's new album "Good crush Dub Sessions"(Nectar Drop) heard in a continuous loop - although a single run takes a long time, especially since the last track is a continuous live mix that is a good 48 minutes long:

Since the album "Jahta Beat: The Lotus Memoirs"Followed the career of DJ Drez, but turned him into a more or less obscure HipHop / Kirtan / Soundscape /DubCorner. Indeed, the man originally comes from hip hop, as you can hear the rumbling drums in many of his works. At some point he must have moved in the direction of yoga and meditation, as Kirtan albums - on which his wife Marti Nikko gives the mantras - can be understood. But even on these he can share his hip-hop roots and sometimes a secret predilection for reggae and Dub do not hide.

He now presents this preference on “Good Crush Dub Sessions ”almost in its purest form, so to speak. Classic instrumentation, a bit spartan and bumpy with echoes of well-known riddims, meets moderate ones Dub-Effects, all presented in a pretty laid-back way. This calm serenity makes me a little nervous at times, in the sense of "takes a long time until the snare sets the next beat". But that could go well with practicing yoga asanas.

I advise everyone to deal with this release with an open mind. I mean that despite all the traditional design, it has something special to offer, how do you see that?

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.
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Review

Roots of Creation: Dub Free or Die, Vol. 1

Some albums vehemently evade categorization, evade clear positioning in the musical universe: for example, when a conglomerate of different musical genres and varieties refuses to be clearly assigned. A current example of this could be "Dub Free or Die, Vol. 1"(Bombshelter Records) by Roots of Creation. The band from New Hampshire was probably a well-booked live act pre-Corona, which, thanks to its reggae-rock-jam hybrids, is ideal for festivals with the primary target group campus young people. In this respect, she hardly differs from her successful reggae rock colleagues from the west coast - Slightly Stupid, Iya Terra, Rebelution & Co. But whether they are so close to their audience that they have the mitgröhl bass line in their program, I dare to doubt:

A reggae steam hammer version of “Seven Nation Army” works best live, of course; for us, however, more interesting in a direct comparison are those on "Dub Free or Die, Vol. 1 ”included Dub-Version with distinctive melodica insert:

The White Stripes title is certainly the most eye-catching track on the album - but it is by no means representative of the rest of the titles, whose arrangements are a tad more elaborate. So if you are a fan of bombastic, breakneck brass sections, sprawling guitar solos and sometimes rocking drum patterns, you will enjoy the album produced by Roots of Creation itself - but it will possibly be more as an instrumental work than as Dub-Estimate release.

Yes, it has something of art rock, of big bands, of theatrical rock overtures á la Jim Steinman - but remains rhythmically and technically in terms of production mostly in reggae or Dub rooted. This mix is ​​what makes it; she lets "Dub Free or Die, Vol. 1 “sound refreshingly different. The “extraordinary” drawer would certainly be suitable for this ... the inclined listener may decide.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.
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Review

Bob Marley in Dub conducted by Cpt. Yossarian

Bob Marley's music is like a good friend. One has known, trusted and valued for a long time; accompanied by ups and downs, puts you in a good mood or gives comfort. Words and sounds are as if set in stone - so perfect that nothing more can be added to them.

Or so perfect that nobody can harm them: We all know Marley covers in abundance, and only very few of them do the originals half justice or can find a new aspect of the composition. One of the few successful endeavors has to be last year's album "BOB“The Austrian / German band So & So feat. Count Captain Yossarian (= Manuel Da Coll, drummer of LaBrassBanda). It is a successful attempt to have Marley's classics interpreted by a brass band - with the exception of drums, guitar and harmonica, almost exclusively wind instruments. The tuba then becomes a bass, and that is not the only surprise: Each track features a solo instrumentalist - and those are well-known musicians from Biermösl Blosn, folkshilfe, Mnozil Brass or LaBrassBanda. Ultimately, however, what defines “BOB” is sticking to the original arrangements with maximum freedom of interpretation at the same time. A successful balancing act that rightly makes the album stand out from the crowd of Marley covers:


... and because the whole thing is so beautiful and multifaceted, one could go a step further: So why not use the material Dub Produce album? All it takes is a Captain Yossarian, i.e. Manuel da Coll, to write the tracks dubbt and the Echo Beach label, which is happy to be used for experiments of this kind. The result is now as "Bob Marley in Dub conducted by Cpt. Yossarian“(Echo Beach) has been released and surprisingly takes“ BOB ”back into more conservative realms. Of the Dub Mix, rather classically reserved, is characterized by what can no longer be heard. The joy of playing various wind instruments gives way to a sedate journey through a sound space expanded with echo and reverb, which considerably reduces the recognition value of the Marley classics and thus gives new sound nuances a chance - for example when the bass tuba turns the "Exodus" bassline into a pounding furiosum lets guess. At the latest then it can be seen that the station wagon Marley, marching band and Dub is not a fun experiment, but "serious business".

Anyone who is open-minded has a clear advantage here. With their artistic standards, professional bands ensure that brass music beyond the village youth orchestra level has lost its horror, and “Bob Marley in Dub conducted by Cpt. Yossarian ”and the wonderful“ BOB ”album are excellent examples and evidence of this. More of the same please!

Rating: 4 out of 5.

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Review

Tsadqan: Dub Meditation

If you are only a little interested in reggae, you cannot avoid typical Nyahbinghi chants. My first contacts with Nyahbinghi Songs were actually “Rastaman Chant” by Bob Marley & The Wailers, followed by Bunny Wailer's “This Train”, Cultures “So long Babylon a fool I”, IJahman's “Zion Hut”, Bob Marley's “Babylon System” and of course albums by Ras Michael (Dadawah) and the parade copy par excellence: Count Ossie & The Mystic Revelation of Rastafari “Grounation”. Even Jimmy Cliff opened his 1980s concerts with the Nyahbinghi Chant "Bongo Man".
The style of music that Rasta and percussionist Oswald Williams alias Count Ossie, who died in 1976, created together with The Mystic Revelation of Rastafari from its early beginnings in the late 1950s to the groundbreaking milestone “Grounation” (1973) and beyond, that is still today The foundation of "Kings Music", i.e. roots reggae.
The Nyahbinghi seances, also called Reasonings or Grounations, exerted an enormous influence on almost all Jamaican musicians, from Prince Buster, Rico, Cedric "IM" Brooks, Tommy McCook to Bob Marley and many other Foundation Artists. Even Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones, an outspoken reggae fan, is enthusiastic about the classic Nyahbinghi sound and therefore produced two albums for the Wingless Angels - a group around Justin Hinds - in the early 1990s. Almost every music lover in the world has known at least one Nyahbinghi song since 1993, namely "Oh Carolina" in the version of Shaggy. Produced by Prince Buster in 1958 with the Folkes Brothers and Count Ossies Afro combo, the original was released in 1960.

Nyahbinghi is derived from an East African territorial movement that opposed European imperialism and was active in various African states from 1850 to 1950. This movement also inspired many Jamaicans to oppose British colonialism in the 50s. This music then got its name from Jamaica and became the musical pillar of the Rasta religion and its followers.

Let's get to the actual project of "Tsadqan: Dub Meditation", the Dub-Album to "The Tsadiq Nyahbinghi". The current album takes us far back in time when the Nyahbinghi style was brought to life. The classical instrumentation: Thunder, Funde and Repeater or also called Kete, was combined to unique melodies by means of an electric bass, sparingly used guitar solos and keyboard interludes. This created a beautiful new mix in which tradition and modern times merge into a unique atmosphere. "Dub Meditation ”contains twelve tracks, two per track Dubs, in classic NyahbinghiDub-Style. The first ten tracks were discreet by Nick Manasseh, who is not unknown here, in his new London studio, that is to say: without major ones DubGimmicks, mixed. The last two tracks on the album are two unreleased bonus tracks from the opus "Shakaroot meets Tsadqan" and here Petah Sunday was allowed to show his mixing talent. The first ten tracks are unreleased Dub-Cuts from the 2020 album "Tsadqan - The Tsadiq Nyahbinghi", which have been withheld until now and only played in a few live performances.

Those who get involved in this typical, unadulterated sound will experience the meditative effect on their own body and rise into the air and glide like on the wings of an eagle. The sound is truly back to the Cradle of Roots Music made in Basel, Switzerland.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.
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Review

Ksanti & Owl Trackers: Time Lapse

Most Dub-Albums obey a consistent style - from the first to the last track. Once the Logic Pro setting has been found, it can be copied from track to track. The collaboration project of the two producers Ksanti & Owl Trackers: "Time Lapse“Breaks with this pattern and rather resembles a journey through different styles, musical influences, moods and tempos. The spectrum ranges from gentle steppers to Indian influences to lo-fi and electro-Dub. And that in just four tracks (and an interlude)!

Ksanti & Owl Trackers are two French producers. Ksanti is a Dubmaker from Bordeaux, with a preference for progressive steppers and musical experiments in the direction of electro, chill and sometimes lo-fi sounds. Owl Trackers, on the other hand, is a Dubmaker from the Paris region, the Dub connects with electro, trip-hop or techno influences and weaves them into fascinating soundscapes.

“Time Lapse” leads us through these landscapes in slow motion. the Dubs radiate an uncommonly contemplative calm while at the same time a feeling of sublimity arises with which we look at the beauty of the imaginary musical landscape. Sounds a bit pompous, but - if you get involved - is what makes these four tracks so attractive. Have a listen. Of the Download is free.