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Interview

19 Questions to: Braintheft

Your Name: Mathieu Pé aka Dubbecame Dubble (Keys and Trumpet by Braintheft, Brass Wood & Wires, The Magic Touch ...)
You live in: Berlin
Title of your latest album: Pressure drop

What is your definition of dub?
Dub is first a minimal, mostly instrumental bass oriented, somewhat psychedelic and trance evolution of Jamaican popular music bringing post-production techniques to the front. It started in the 60's as an emancipation of the sound engineer as central part of the creative process. The mixing desk became an instrument. Dub had a huge influence worldwide. The minimal and trance aspects brought a whole new time perception in popular music leading the way to all electronic styles as we know them now.

What is essential for a good dub?
Space and Bass !!!

What is the difference between a good and a bad dub?
Who am I to judge? I'd say I like or I don't.

How would you describe your style of dub?
I try to keep up to the roots staying away from the computer as much as possible, using actual instruments and analog gear. So hopefully it sounds more authentic.

What is your process of creating a typical dub-track?
Well, the good old way of doing it was first to record a song with the band. Then bounce it down to eight discrete tracks in order to mix it on the flight at the mixing board with all sort of effects connected to it. So that's how I like to work too. I believe to get inspired by limitations.

When you're satisfied with a dub produced by you?
If I felt the flow while mixing and there's no major issues: I'm happy. I believe the better is the enemy of the good. Most of the time first takes that thing you can't reproduce.

What are your personal top 5 dub albums?
In no particular order:

Augustus Pablo: King Tubby meet Rockers uptown
Serge Gainsbourg feat. Sly and Robby: Aux armes etcetera
High tone: Opus Incertaint
Scientist: Heavy wheight Dub
Jackie Mittoo: Champion of the Arena

Who is the greatest dub artist of all time for you?
Guess what ... the King: King Tubby. The simple fact that he was the first makes him untouchable.

And who is the currently most interesting dub-artist?
The Breadwinners (Alan Redfern at Bakery Studio). Best sounding dub I heard in a long time. All analog, pure feeling. Check him out.

What is the musically most interesting decade for you? Why
The seventies for sure. Because the electrification of music brought a lot in all styles. New genres popped out everywhere. It was a very creative time. Probably because back then the music industry, the distribution, democratization of private copy, the access to musical instruments boomed like crazy.

Where is the biggest market for your music?
France is the last el-dorado. We played at the last telerama Dub with braintheft. It was amazing to see how young the crowd was! The venue was packed of Bass addicted youngsters! Go west!

Are you able to earn a living with your music?
Not really. And I'm not running after it otherwise I'd make compromises to do so.

Which artist would you like to work with?
There is so much ... and not only in dub. I'd say Victor Rice would be one of them just to keep that list short.

What is your particular strength?
Inner peace.

What do you enjoy most about what you are doing?
Playing! In all contexts would it be behind the mixer or instruments, at home, with friends, on stage ...

What horrifies you in the studio?
The time / money factor! There's never enough time in the studio!

When not tinkering with dubs, what do you prefer to do?
Playing trumpet! Tweaking synths!

What is the current health status of dub?
Dub and music in general knows no illness. In todays world where musical vividness tends to be measured in financial success, talking about health of a style makes little sense. Money is at the root of all evil and it affects music as everything else.

How do you see the future of dub?
It will still be there in fifty years because Dub artists have experimentation in the blood. So I guess it will keep on and on, mixing with other styles.

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Interview

19 questions to: Dub Spencer & Trance Hill

Your name: Philipp Greter (keyboardist and producer of Dub Spencer & Trance Hill)
You live in: Lucerne (Switzerland)
Title of your last album: William S. Burroughs IN DUB - conducted by Dub Spencer & Trance Hill (Echo Beach 2014)

What is your definition of Dub?
The following characteristics define for me "Dub"
• off-beat feeling
• no clear song structures
• played very reduced
• Little or no singing
• Enriched with effects, so that the listener can immerse himself in the music.
The real environment can sometimes rapture. I love it when, while listening, one suddenly doubts whether a sound is coming from the speakers or whether it comes from a chirping bird on the windowsill.

What about a good one Dub indispensable?
A deep, warm bass sound.

What distinguishes a good from a bad Dub?
You should hear the handwriting of the producer or the band. Therein lies the difficulty and the art. There are many Dub-Tracks that sound just too random.

How would you your Dub-Describe style?
As I did above the "Dub“With a psychedelic twist. The distorted guitar sound of Markus Meier, which is actually in the Dub rather atypical and rare. Furthermore, the absolutely deep bass sound of Marcel Stalder and the virtuosity of the drummer Julian Dillier.

How does the creation process of a typical Dub-Tracks from you guys?
We play everything live and together in day and night-long recording sessions. The material is then passed through the Dubwolf shot (it's in my little home studio at home). And already done.

When are you with one of you produced Dub satisfied?
Well, that's one of the things ... If it sounds good to my ears, I'm happy. Usually only when the date has come to deliver the material ;-)

What are your personal Dub-Top 5 albums?
Augustus Pablo and King Tubby: Rockers meets King Tubby in a Firehouse
The Upsetters: Blackboard Jungle Dub
Jackie Mittoo: Champion in the arena
Rhythm & Sound: The Versions
Trentemøller: The last resort
Understood: There are hundreds of others who belong here too ...

Who is the greatest for you Dub-Artist of all time?
King Tubby. Co-inventor of the Dub. With the limited resources available to him, he conjured up great recordings!

And who is currently the most interesting Dub-Artist?
Umberto Echo. Live at the mixer and as a studio producer. Absolute cream! That's why we love working with him so much (he is of course an exceptionally fine guy too ;-).

What is the musically most interesting decade for you? Why?
Now and the future. Because we don't yet know what's coming.

What is your current favorite album?
Unfortunately, I'm not exactly up to date ... The productions of Aldub I like it very much, as well as the Blood and Fire samplers.

Can you make a living with music?
In part ... As a used car dealer you would probably earn better ;-)

Which artist would you like to work with?
Unfortunately all of them died.

What is your particular strength?
Our strength lies in the collective. As a live band, we always manage to pull people away who actually don't know anything Dub- Have music on your hat.

What do you enjoy most about your job?
To have no limits and to inspire people!

What do you dread in the studio?
When the technology doesn't work and when the beer runs out ...

When you're not at Dubs screwing, what is your favorite thing to do then?
Family outings ;-)

What is the current state of health of Dub?
I have to ask the doctor. Surely already old and frail. But we live longer and longer. Every now and then a lift, then it's okay.

How do you see the future of Dub?
As long as I live he lives too Dub, afterwards it's my sausage.

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Interview

Interview: Dubmatix

You have to get used to a new thought: the best Dub and Dub-oriented reggae no longer comes from England or France (not even from Germany or even Jamaica). He comes from: Canada! Because there is currently the hardest-working, most talented and probably also the cleverest producer of the genre: Dubmatix. He is not only a studio virtuoso par excellence, but also an incredibly reflective artist and perfectionist, who, with his unmistakable feeling for the ultimate groove, pulls out productions that define the current state of the art of the genre. When music hits, you feel no pain - luckily, one can only say, because the rhythms of Dubmatix strike with irrepressible force. But this power does not arise from bass and even more bass, but is the result of a finely thought-out arrangement and perfectly fitting timing, which brings every single element of the music to its maximum effect. This studied musician started work 10 years ago and has since produced 6 brilliant albums (Dub and vocal). Now he reveals how his music is made and what makes its special quality.

What is your definition of Dub?
Space! Space, experiment and freedom. In the center of Dub stand drum & bass. They form the foundation. The song, the instrumentation, the effects and the arrangement only serve to strengthen this foundation. Dub is one of the few musical genres that offers almost unlimited freedom - anything is possible. For me it is Dub the highest form of musical expression. There are no hard and fast rules.

Your father is a well-known jazz musician. Has it influenced your musical development?
My father played blues, funk, rock, jazz - everything, and we always had bands at home that my father rehearsed with. In addition, as a small child I was allowed to go on tours and spent a lot of time in the studio. My parents were also reggae fans and heard the young Bob Marley. My father played in one of the first reggae bands in Toronto during the early 70s. Over the years it has all influenced me a lot: my father's record collection, the music he played himself - and of course my parents' encouragement to learn an instrument and to try out all kinds of music. It all created the core of who I am today in musical terms.

You have a degree in music. How does academic training affect your music?
I started playing drums when I was a little kid. When I was 11, I was given the opportunity to learn a second instrument: tuba or bass. It was an easy choice - I went for the bass without hesitation. So for the next 7 years I learned to play the double bass. I learned to read music, interpret music and play as part of an ensemble. It was a fantastic experience. At the same time I learned to play the piano and took jazz guitar lessons. All of this finally enabled me to grasp musical ideas, to implement them, to record, to mix and finally to publish them.

You would expect someone like that to play more classical music or at least jazz. How did you get into reggae?
I've listened to a lot of classical music, but also a lot of blues, rock, metal, punk, hip hop, funk and reggae - practically every genre. But there is something about reggae that particularly appeals to me. Perhaps that has to do with the fact that my two most important instruments, drum & bass, are also the most important instruments of reggae. In addition, reggae with its sub-genres offers such a diverse musical landscape in which you can romp around and experiment that it inspires me immensely. I also never tire of a good skank. Reggae is also incredibly uplifting, positive music. I love Marley's line of text: “When music hits, you feel no pain”. It expresses exactly what the musical art form "reggae" stands for.

How does your musical training help you in the production of reggae?
I've spent most of the time in studios over the past 25 years, experimenting a lot with styles and techniques. I've learned to understand exactly what I'm doing and how I can create certain sounds. But my real training was to listen to the reggae productions of the 70s and find out how they got that dry drum sound, or how they went about making the bass sound so big and fat, or why it was sounds so good when the winds play slightly out of tune, or how they produced that incredibly percussive guitar skank. This knowledge is very important in my studio work today. Just as one learns by z. B. re-enacting a Jimi Hendrix solo note for note, I tried to "reproduce" King Tubby mixes and imitate the clean, polished Marley recordings or the reduced sound of a Burning Spear.

Your productions are complex and incredibly detailed, but at the same time they sound very simple and clear. How you do that? What is your approach to producing reggae?
Experimenting and layering, constructing and deconstructing, these are the essential elements. I always start with a drum pattern or a bassline - the whole song develops from there. I try a lot: one drop, stepper, half step, blend, etc. - until I find the perfect drum pattern for the bassline (or vice versa). As soon as I have a drum & bass rhythm that I am satisfied with, I layer the instruments on top of each other: organ bubbles, organ skanks, piano skanks, guitar skanks, guitar riffs, organ riffs, synths (if it fits), percussion, etc. When the track is ready, then I may decide to replace the programmed drums with live ones or to record the bassline again. I delve into the smallest details until everything is perfectly coordinated. For me, music is like a puzzle where every piece has its place. Every instrument, every effect, every sound has its own specific position. The last step is adding the effects: echo, reverb, reverb, phasers, sound FX, cymbal crashes, drum rolls.
Then I listen carefully. Does the piece have a continuous flow, from the beginning to the end? Are there any irrelevant items that I can remove without loss? Sometimes I remove an entire chorus or verse when I feel like the piece is stuck somewhere. If I wander with my thoughts while listening, it is a sign for me to shorten or restructure the piece.
Only when I can listen to the piece without anything bothering me do I know that I have finished my work. I am very particular about it. It can be a single hi-hat beat that I don't like that makes me feel uncomfortable. Then I sit down and tinker with it until it is finally correct. Only then am I satisfied.

You've been recording a lot of vocal tunes lately. How do you choose the artists you want to work with? How do you contact them? Do you tell them what to sing?
When I started letting artists voice my rhythms for my album “Renegade Rocker” in 2007, I contacted almost all of them via Myspace. Ranking Joe, Pinchers, Sugar Minott, Mykal Rose, Linval Thompson - all on Myspace! Today this is done through promoters, tour managers and friends.
Usually I send the artists a few selected rhythms from me and let them decide which one they want to voic. For me, that's exactly why I want to work with them: I want their vibe on the rhythm. They should sing whatever comes to mind. I usually produce specific rhythms for individual artists, in exactly the style that suits them. For example, I sent Alton Ellis a rock steady rhythm. As soon as I get the vocals, I do them intensely. Most of the vocals that can be heard on my productions have been edited to a greater or lesser extent. Sometimes I cut entire stanzas or split them up, or I create a chorus from a hook that I found somewhere in a stanza. Always with the aim of enriching the overall production. One important technique I've developed is simply to give a song room to breathe. This can be heard on almost all of my tracks: After a chorus, the vocals only start again after four bars at the earliest. Instead, maybe the horns can kick in, or I just let the music play. It is very important to me that the singing has ebb and flow, so that it is dynamically embedded in the music and never dominates the song.

What inspires you
Traveling and touring opens my ears to new styles of music and new sounds, which I really want to experiment with. For example, on our tour last November, we listened to MUSE for hours while driving between two gigs. The sound bored into my head. When I got back home in the studio recording songs for my album “Rebel Massive”, I incorporated some of these ideas into the song with Prince Jazzbo (RIP). The same goes for certain Steppers sounds that I encountered, as well as for Dubstep and jungle. At the moment I'm inspired by Congo Natty, who brings back memories of the 90ies jungle in me.

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Interview

24 Questions to: Zion Train

Your name: Neil Perch
You live in: Cologne
Title of your latest album or your last EP: Dub Conference by Abassi All Stars 2013, previously State of Mind by Zion Train 2011.

What is your definition of Dub?
Dub is psychedelic reggae ... deconstructed and reinterpreted by the mixing engineer.

What is essential for a good dub?
Essential for a good dub is a good tune / song to start with and a talented, open minded mixing engineer.

You are a pioneer of UK-produced dub. How did you get into the business?
I got into dub by being hugely affected by sound systems, mainly Jah Shaka - once I heard that, I had to make music like it.

You produce dub-music for more than 20 years now. Do you still enjoy it?
In fact I produce dub for over 25 years now and every day I remember I am one of the lucky people who earns their living with something they love and that touches other people “s hearts - so yes, I still enjoy it.

What was your biggest success and your biggest failure?
My biggest success is always avoiding categorization. My biggest failure is not YET converting the whole of humanity into dub loving pacifists.

How has the dub-music scene changed, since you started your business? When was the best time?
Dub music has gone international since I started in it when it was not even well known in the UK. At the same time the internet has started and multiplied, Cds were born and since then CDs and vinyl have died so the scene has changed hugely - what remains the same is the basic positivity that always comes with Dub. The best time is yet to come ... of course.

How would you describe your style of dub?
I would describe my style of Dub as open minded.

What is your process of creating a typical dub-track?
I have no typical process of producing a Dub track as I like to take a different approach everytime I work in the recording studio - I treat it as a personal challenge. However in general first a musical idea, then record it, back it up with instruments, sonic texture and arangements, then deconstruct into dub using the chosen method of the day.

What do you like best about dub-music?
I like the mental space Dub music provides - a universal language with no need for words.

What are your personal top 5 dub albums?
Israel vibration: Israel Dub
Aswad: New Chapter Of Dub
King Tubby: Dub Jackpot
Burning Spear: Living Dub
Creation Rebel: Starship Africa

Who is the greatest dub artist of all time for you?
King Tubby is the greatest Dub artist of all time for me.

And who is the currently most interesting dub artist?
Radikal Guru (PL) and Gentlemans Dub Club (UK).

What is the musically most interesting decade for you? Why?
Musically most interesting decade 68-78 due to the technology explosion, the political and social changes that rocked the worked at the time.

What is your current favorite album?
Revolver by the Beatles.

What is your opinion on dubstep?
Dubstep is an interesting musical phenomenom with an occassional good tune - but like most musical explosions, it is 95% rubbish.

Are you able to earn a living with your music?
I have earnt my living for 25 years solely through music.

What is your particular strength?
Discipline, honor and respect.

What do you enjoy most about what you are doing?
The thing I enjoy most about what I do is FREEDOM - particularly the freedom of self expression.

When not tinkering with dubs, what do you prefer to do?
When not tinkering with Dubs I prefer to tinker with my dog.

Is there something you still want to achieve? A big goal?
I still need to achieve converting the world into pacifist Dub lovers - so I will stick to that task.

Where and how do you see yourself 10 years from now?
I guess I will be right here on planet earth still try to achieve converting the world into pacifist Dub lovers.

If you could choose the one most essential track from your oeuvre, which one would it be?
I never listen to my own music outside of the studio or performance, many of my tracks are important for personal reasons but I hope never have to choose an essential track.

How do you see the future of Dub?
The future of Dub, is more global spread, more diverse influences, more people diluting it, stealing the essence and making money from it but hopefully more peace and love through the spread of this good vibes sound and attitude.

If time and money wouldn't count: What project would you like to start?
I would deweaponize the globe and feed every hungry mouth there is.

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Interview

20 questions to: The Dubvisionist

Your name: Felix Wolter
You live in: Hanover
Title of your last album or your last EP: "Dubvision III “, an album compilation with Dubtunes (own material and material from friends), from my studio M7.
TVS - "Lovin Peace" EP, my Steppas project

What is your definition of Dub? 
Just do it “differently”. Cultivate wonder and amazement. Breaking listening habits and re-evaluating source material.

What about a good one Dub indispensable?
The basic atmosphere.

What distinguishes a good from a bad Dub?
The good is based on vibes, the bad is based on technology.

How would you your Dub-Describe style?
As a Dubvisionist, I go to work “classically”. A Dub has an original, at best well known. Then new arrangements on the mixer and the "making visible" of sub-tracks make sense of the conscious listening pleasure.
I work differently at TVS. Here electronically interpreted beats are created as an atmosphere in which you can experiment with other elements. I find the friction between electronic sounds and roots influences interesting.
In addition, I'm still working on 2 related downtime projects, PFL and Chin Chillaz. Further musical essences flow into this. In this case it works Dub as a melting pot that combines different styles into something new.

How does the creation process of a typical Dub-Tracks from you?
Trax go through different stages with me. I collect ideas in a “backing pool”. When I get the feel for the song, it goes on. Someone is voicing the song or playing instrumental overdubs on it. At some point the track is a song and / or a Dub. I'm not rushing. I give the material as much time as it takes.

When are you with one of your produced Dub satisfied?
When it's done and I know where to use it.

What are your personal Dub-Top 5 albums?
Aswad: New Chapter Of Dub
Keith Hudson: Pic A Dub
King Tubbys: Meets Rockers Uptown
Scientist: Meets The Space Invaders
African Head Charge: My Life In A Hole In The Ground

Who is the greatest for you Dub-Artist of all time?
King Tubby produced a really unique sound. Thanks to his technical knowledge, he was able to sound out the resilience of the devices in a completely different way than others. He had partly built or modified devices himself. This resulted in a unique selling point in the sound that earned it the title "King".

And who is currently the most interesting Dub-Artist?
I think Mad Professor is very cool. An album The roots of Dubstep and then "as always" British roots Dub I think it's great to deliver. But not everyone understands this sense of humor. No matter - for his interpretation of Money on DubAbout Side of the Moon (Remix album by the Easy Star Allstars) I can celebrate it in a big way. He's so cheeky and anarchist about it. That really impressed me again.

What is the musically most interesting decade for you? Why?
There is good music in all decades. Of course, in the 70s I love the original roots reggae from Jamaica. For me, the 80s represent influences from the UK, e.g. the overlap of Dub and punk. In the 90s the UK steppas came and from 2K on I continued with downtempo Dub.

What is your current favorite album?
Kiddus I: Topsy Turvy World. A very nice album, I would love to have some dubI.

In what form do you buy your music: vinyl, CD, download, subscription? Why?
Fortunately, good music always finds me - no matter what form.

Can you make a living with music?
Yes, similar to that of my colleagues. From my Dubproductions alone, i can't pay all the bills. But I make a living from music. In addition to the studio and productions, I run the digital label “Time Tools Recordings” with a friend. There I am responsible for the sub-label “Percussion & Electronics”, on which I publish many of my projects. I also do remixes and Dubs for other artists. At the moment I am working on the light and sound installation “Seelewaschen”, which will take place here in Hanover in the Maschpark from June 15.6. until July 15.7 takes place. That is ambient sound in an urban living space. The common ground in this project is the Dub on the focus of deceleration.

Which artist would you like to work with?
I'm looking forward to my next remix for my colleagues from the Senior Allstars, whom Sarah Winton (singer of Nightmares On Wax, among others) was able to win for the vocals of a Trax. Sarah had voiced titles from Chin Chillaz before. I love her angelic way of singing and I look forward to your contribution.

What is your particular strength?
My weakness for music.

What do you enjoy most about your job?
That he's my job.

What do you dread in the studio?
Demos. I hate demos and haven't done one in 30 years. I hate nothing more than having to chase after an idea that was defined in the demo. It should of course sound just as expressive and spontaneous, but just "in a better sound format". Rubbish - never really works convincingly. The moment makes the music, not the technology.

When you're not at Dubs screwing, what is your favorite thing to do then?
Cook. The stove is like a mixer and a good meal is like a good one Dub.

What is the current state of health of Dub?
Quite well in my opinion. We have been running the "Liberation Skank" four times a year here in Hanover for about 3 years. This is a Roots & Dub Dance with Sounds & Members from Hanover and Berlin such as Cham Panda, Chris Re-Ignation, Sandokan Intl., Tobi Dread and TVS /Dubvisonist. All parties are always well attended. We play roots Dub and British UK Steppers for a really interested young audience.

How do you see the future of Dub?
The "Liberation Skank" collective makes parties in an environment that values ​​awareness. The motto is: No slackness, pure vibes. Celebrate with respect, without homophobia and sexism. I think that's great and sometimes really modern.

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Interview

20 questions to: Aldubb

Your name: Aldubb
You live in: Berlin
Title of your last album or your last EP: Aldubb meets Diana Levi 10 ″ EP / Welcome to Bassland CD

What is your definition of Dub?
Hard to say. Remixed reggae music with little vocal content, I always insist on the difference between Dub and "Soundsystem" / "Steppas with Singing". Then there is a whole world full of Dubwho actually has nothing to do with reggae and yet Dub is called. So for me there are hardly any limits, little vocal, that is perhaps the most important thing - besides a bass-heavy arrangement and the mix, of course.

What distinguishes a good from a bad Dub?
My brain. I can't really pin down that, I think some things are good, some not so. As a producer, I have the stupid habit of always listening with an analytical ear, which is sometimes annoying because I always think about how this or that was done, or I analyze the mix, but whether one Dub is good or bad, don't tell me that, luckily that's still a bit of magic.

How would you your Dub-Describe style?
Now it's getting nasty ... It always depends on the project, my own things range from roots to “steppas with singing” to techdub or even Dubstep. I am popular as a remixer because of my wobble bass in connection with King Tubby's moderate delay styles. The Space Echo is my most important instrument ;-)

How does the creation process of a typical Dub-Tracks from you?
First I make a "song" - if there is a vocal track. Then I break the arrangement up into groups of instruments and rearrange the song using the classic Dub-Do things, so mute, delays, reverb, actually it's pretty classic, like King Tubby and Lee Perry did. Sometimes I cut up the tracks quite radically on the digital level, or for example replace a bass track with a synthesizer. A really "typical" DubI can't really imagine track of mine right now. One track I still celebrate is “Let there be dub“Somehow everything is there, mystical speaking vocals with a wink, filtered wobble basses, digital drum sounds with a lot of effect, but also real percussion and riddimsection.

When are you with one of your produced Dubs satisfied?
Sometimes pretty quickly - that's often a good sign, sometimes it takes forever (but that doesn't have to be a bad thing). I've got used to leaving the versions lying around for a while, and sometimes playing to people I trust. At some point I'll declare the song finished. However, I find it easier to do so when there is a deadline or a release date. The worst thing is when I do my own things, I could go on filing forever, I sometimes set myself deadlines ;-)

What are your personal Dub-Top 5 albums?
Dub Chemists: Light up your chalice
Paul St Hilaire: Unspecified
East meets West: Time is the master
King Tubby: Declaration of Dub
Lee Perry: Kung Fu Meets the Dragon

Who is the greatest for you Dub-Artist of all time?
Lee Perry

And who is currently the most interesting Dub-Artist?
No plan, I hear very little current Dub. What I do know is that the last Mad Professor album wasn't that great. So far I've really celebrated everything from Benga, but that's yes Dubstep ...

What is the musically most interesting decade for you? Why?
The 70s, pretty much everything was invented that still exists today, punk, house, metal, hip-hop, funk - reggae has been around for a while, but the best and most radical things came out of the 70s too. Dub had its heyday, rock bands experimented with all kinds of electronic avant-garde. It's hard to do something new today.

What do you hear besides Dub?
Pretty much everything except Gothic, Wave and Depeche Mode. When metal gets too progressive, I'll quit too. I like repetitive music, but not too minimal. I also find a certain punk attitude important, I don't like overly smooth productions in any style.

What is your current favorite album?
Haha, Cultural roots: Drift Away From Evil it is out of date, but I just discovered it for myself. Errol Brown is one of the best at the mixer!

In what form do you buy your music: vinyl, CD, download, subscription? Why?
Preferably vinyl, if possible, but also CD. I've never downloaded it before, I still think that you have to put music on the shelf, for whatever reason. Actually, I don't buy a lot of music anymore, I listen to so much in the studio all day and then my own stuff. As a consumer, I prefer to listen to music in a club or, best of all, at an open air, at home really little.

Can you make a living with music?
I make a living from him Planet Earth Studio - so mostly with music. My label One-drop music however, makes no profit. So if you classify karaoke and audio books as music in the broadest sense, then yes ;-)

Which artist would you like to work with?
Mutabaruka, Linton Kwesi Johnson ...

What is your particular strength?
Much experience. I have a feeling that the longer I do this, the better I hear. It also often helps that I play some instruments, especially drums and bass, myself. What I always underestimate is my knowledge of studio technology and devices in general. I find it normal to know what a compressor does and how to use a patchbay. But unfortunately many producers are using more and more presets and don't even know what a Treshhold is or how to use an aux path. You can hear that somehow.

What do you enjoy most about your job?
Satisfied costumers. But I chose this job because I've always liked to be surrounded by music equipment and instruments. I only got to know and appreciate the human side in everyday studio life. There is nothing better than when a musician has the feeling that he has found the perfect studio.

What do you dread in the studio?
Apart from burglary, fire and technical problems that hold up the whole operation, it annoys me when people don't know what they want and always want to do everything from scratch. There are “rappers” who then start looking for their beat on YouTube in the studio and write the lyrics. I now calculate the hours for it really hard, but it's still annoying.

When you're not at Dubs screwing, what is your favorite thing to do then?
To travel.

Which music website do you prefer to visit?
Soundcloud.

How do you see the future of Dub?
Dub is actually timeless. Inspired every few years Dub sometimes a new style of music, last Dubstep, formerly House and Triphop. I am very excited. I think somebody will always remix reggae songs, that's just too much fun to stop at some point.

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Interview

16 questions to: iLLBiLLY HiTEC

Your name: iLLBiLLY HiTEC
You live in: Berlin
Title of your last album: Reggaetronics (Echo Beach)

What is your definition of Dub?
For me there is somehow no definition. Dub is limitless, can merge with pretty much all genres of music, and simply offers a lot of opportunities to let off steam. That's what makes music so interesting for us.

What distinguishes a good from a bad Dub?
Technically it should be right, the rest is a matter of taste.

How would you your Dub-Describe style?
We generally have a lot of vocals in our productions and therefore use effects sparingly. All in all, apart from the excursions into electronics, our style is quite reggae-heavy.

How does the creation process of a typical Dub-Tracks from you guys?
We'll do that out of our guts. It usually takes a long time to get the final result, but the first hook comes spontaneously. We have higher calling z. B. The process, melody and vocals were finished very quickly - but the fine-tuning took a while.

When are you with one of your produced Dub satisfied?
Never. Isn't that always the case? We tend to come to a point with every song where you wonder if it will get better or worse if you keep going.

Who is currently the most interesting Dub-Artist?
Al is from Germanydubb certainly at the forefront. Live have me personally Kaly Live Dub very flashed from Lyon. We played with them once in Bucharest - very good musicians and great performance.

What do you hear besides Dub?
Thomas comes from hip hop, Longfingah is a right reggae head. I'm actually more of a rock. That Dub and similar sounds have become our musical focus, is probably due to the breadth of the possibilities of the genre.

In what form do you buy your music: vinyl, CD, download, subscription? Why?
Depending on the production, very different for me personally. But Thomas almost only has vinyl.

Do you manage to make a living with music?
It's very close.

Which artist would you like to work with?
There are quite a few. You have to wait and see what is still going on with the vocals and the mixer.

What is your particular strength?
Although there are only three of us performing, Longfingah's vocals and the live drums create the experience of a concert. In addition, our program is also very varied due to the different styles. So we can play at very different events and reach people from all corners.

What do you enjoy most about your job?
The tours and the resulting friendships are a lot of fun for us and also give us energy and ideas to develop the project further. Travel is always worth it!

What do you dread in the studio?
Before we finish producing the songs, we'll take them on tour. You get used to the fat live sound of the drums, the large PA and the vibrating stage. In the studio everything sounds comparatively dry at first. I get frightened every time.

When you're not at Dubs screwing, what do you like to do then?
Music doesn't leave us much time for other things at the moment. But Thomas has a great passion for walkmans, ghetto blasters and sneakers. But cooking is my top priority. Good food shreds!

Which music website do you prefer to visit?
Soundcloud.

How much you the future of Dub?
In Germany the scene is currently quite manageable, but still well positioned. I think there is still potential. Some artists become the Dub sure to bring it forward soon.

Categories
Interview

20 questions to: Umberto Echo

Your name: Umberto Echo
You live in: Munich
Title of your last album: Elevator Dubs, March 15, 2013 Enja Records

What is your definition of Dub?
Instrumental music based on reggae with a little vocals and sometimes extreme effects, not necessarily echo but often and happily, sometimes solos.

What distinguishes a good from a bad Dub?
A worse Dub gets boring quickly because it is predictable. You can always hear a good one.

How would you your Dub-Describe style?
Eclectic maximalist.

How does the creation process of a typical Dub-Tracks from you?
Ideally, I have an idea in advance that I can then implement. Sometimes I end up somewhere else, which doesn't necessarily have to be bad.
I open the session, mix the tune so that all elements sound good and then start taking individual elements in and out and alienating them. Then I am in my world for a few hours. When I have a good feeling with the base, I take a break and listen to the whole thing with a little distance.
Then it's time to fine-tune. I go over individual passages and refine the transitions and remove unnecessary parts. Possibly. I play a few tracks myself and or invite a musician friend so that he can play a little something for me. If I am satisfied with everything that is going on, one more lap will only be honed on the sound.

When are you with one of your produced Dubs satisfied?
If I can listen to it several times in a row without wanting to change anything and find it interesting every time I listen to it.

What are your personal Dub-Top 5 albums?
Aswad: New Chapter in Dub
Mad Professor vs. Le Scratch Perry: Dub Take The Voodoo out of Reggae
Scientist: Dub From the ghetto
Earl 16: The Fittest Dub versions
Umberto Echo: Dub Train

Who is the greatest for you Dub-Artist of all time?
Lee Perry, I've been happy about him so often. It's not necessarily the best, but the coolest.

And who is currently the most interesting Dub-Artist?
Umberto Echo

What is the musically most interesting decade for you? Why?
70s. Warm sound, real vibes, real musicians, optimism.

What do you hear besides Dub?
Jazz, HipHop, Soul, Funk, Afrobeat, Electronic Music, High End Pop, Classical, in the past a lot of Punk, Hardcore, Rock.

What is your current favorite album?
Antun Opic "You Can Spare A Dime"

In what form do you buy your music: vinyl, CD, download, subscription? Why?
CDs. I grew up like that, haven't changed yet. Price performance (sound) is especially good for older albums.

Can you make a living with music?
I produce a lot of music for other people in various genres and live from it exclusively. I hardly make any money with my own music.

Which artist would you like to work with?
All who will come

What is your particular strength?
Good hearing, having fun, musicality.

What do you enjoy most about your job?
Producing my own albums and being able to make all the decisions on my own.

What do you dread in the studio?
Badly prepared musicians with out of tune instruments.

When you're not at Dubs screwing, what is your favorite thing to do then?
Record and mix good music.

Which music website do you prefer to visit?
I rarely do it, tend to look for certain people (musicians) who interest me, you always end up somewhere else.

How do you see the future of Dub?
Positive! Dubstep will sink further into the mainstream varieties and new people will become the old ones Dub- Reinterpret concepts in unexpected ways.

Categories
Interview

"I have Jesus on my cock" - Lee Perry saves the world.

I just came across this interview with Lee Perry in 2002. I had a great time reading it again now. I had completely forgotten how absurdly funny our conversation 11 years ago was.

Lee Perry

Lee Perry, the Madman himself turned madness into a method. He set out - in the incarnation of Pipecock Jackxon - to save the world and to de-voodoo the damned. His tool is no longer the mixer (as in earlier days), but only the word, his word. Because what Mr. Perry offers us in his late recordings and on stage are words. Disjointed, random, crazy. As a living legend, it is dragged through the concert halls and studios of the world, offering a tragic picture of lost grandeur. Lee Perry has just completed a tour with Mad Professor, on which he presents himself hung with mirrors and amulets and texts like: "I have Jesus Christ on my cock, Selassie on my back, Marcus Garvey on my leg, and Jews in my shoes" for the best. In the subsequent interview, he revealed that he was wearing dollar bills under the soles of his shoes and stated that he was the Lord of the Rings.

Hello Mr. Perry, you have come back to Trojan Records for your new record "Jamaican et", who licensed their records back in the late 60s.
The plate is not special for Trojan or anyone. It is for all people who believe that God will save them. There are so many Lee Perry records out there that I don't know about. People all stole my tapes.

But Trojan didn't steal the tapes, did it?
Fans think these are Lee Perry records, but they are not. Lee Perry is a good name! Carrying it is a luxury. Something is wrong here!

But you produced the album yourself - at least it says on the cover.
Stop accusing me of things I didn't do.

Who are the musicians you worked with on “Jamaican et”?
The record is my work. Chris Blackwell stole it from me.

Blackwell is from Island Records, not from Trojan ...
What I do from now on will no longer be stolen! Because there are no Jamaican comedians as musicians.

Well, let's change the subject: on stage you said you believe in magic. Is that correct?
For sure. Magic is my queen. And logic is my god. I also believe in pussies.

Interesting. How is your collaboration with Mad Professor, with whom you are currently on tour?
He's the only black guy I'm still dealing with. Otherwise I don't want to have anything to do with black people.

But the musicians on stage are black.
Yes, they look terrible. But the white bassist is an idiot too.

Why don't you want black people around you anymore?
They are vampires. They bite too deep - they have no mercy.

Uh ...
I hope you forgive me for what I say but I am a fortune teller. I can see your future Black people have an evil spirit - I don't want them knocking on my door.

Why do you think that?
Everything was black. The Black Ark (Perry's studio in the 70's) was black. But if there is too much black around you, then that is bad. Because where it is black there is no light.

Do you still live in Switzerland?
I would not have survived the years if I had stayed in Jamaica. I would have been poisoned by the Pope. That's why I don't want a Pope here in this room.

How do you feel about your great time in Jamaica?
If I remember what happened there, I want to blow up this damn island.

You said that your new album (which by the way was released by Trojan) would have “Education” and “Dancing”. What do you mean by "Education"?
We have this song and that dance, reincarnation and incarnation. We construct bones and flesh, brains and genes there. Genes are in the brain and generate brain waves there with instant telepathic, mental commands. Everything comes from the Creator. The creator is omnipotent.

Why are you wearing this amulet-stuck cap?
It is for the Jews (he takes off his hat and shows us that it is lined with dollar bills on the inside). You have no money in your shoes - but what gives you the right to believe that I also have no money in your shoes? (He takes off his shoes, takes out the sole and shows us that there are dollar bills stuck to it from below.)

Why is the money in the hat?
This is for the people who believe in me. They feed on my brain.

And the money in your shoes? It's far from the brain.
This is for the poor who beg for bread on the street.

Does your t-shirt have a meaning too?
My machete shows that. The name of my machete is Sabata.

Do you believe in Rastafarian?
If I didn't do that, I would be like everyone else. If I didn't believe in Rastafari, I would have to get soldiers and police officers for protection.

They also sang about Jesus on stage.
If Jesus is white I believe in him, if he is black I believe in him too.

Don't you see any contradiction?
Do you know what Rastafarian is?

Yes.
If you hold this glass of water against the sun in the morning, you will see a rainbow. This is Rastafarian.

Oh, so.
(He picks up the glass half filled with water and pours it out) Where does your stream of life come from? From God! I don't want parasites who don't believe in God to come on my show. If there are parasites like that, I can't entertain people who believe in God. Then I go crazy and can't work properly. And it works!

What is the meaning of all the mirrors that you wear on your body?
I am the elements man. Before I set foot on this planet, I decided to appear in this color. I am pure energy. I am the sun that shines, I am the sun of Jamaica. I didn't look for the money - the money found me. When I'm on stage, you see 12 planets circling there. There's no room up there for human beings. I am not a human being - only my flesh is human.

How do you know you are the energy?
Because the energy speaks through me. I am the omnipresent. I am the upsetter.

Where would reggae be today without your contribution?
There would be no reggae and there would be no world without Lee Scratch Perry. Everything had to start at the beginning - and I am the beginning.

Do you represent the world?
Why, surely! I am Lee Scratch Perry. I do everything differently. There are so many people who have been put under an evil voodoo curse. My job is to devoodoo these people - even if they don't even know they are voodoo. I am the healer.

Are your texts freely improvised or have you rehearsed them?
They come to me from the Lord of the Rings.

Who is the lord of the rings
He gave me this ring of fire 20 years ago. The ring exudes fire that cannot be seen. Sssssspashhhh, there come the flames. And after the flames the sky opens: Baahhhhhhhhhh! It was like this.

Mister Perry, thank you very much for the interview.