Categories
Reggae

iLLBiLLY HiTEC: King Size Dub Special - Overdubbed by Dub Pistols

Out of us over! The iLLBiLLY HiTECs give up. What a pity. The world needs good reggae bands who are keen to experiment and play, who don't care about narrow genre boundaries and orthodox style theory, bands who succeed in sharing the energy of 90ies dancehall Dub and electronics that really get going and produce real party music - without switching off claim and intelligence. In short: iLLBiLLY HiTEC is disbanding and has earned an official obituary in the form of a best-of album - and that is exactly what gives them "King Size Dub Special: iLLBiLLY HiTEC (Overdubbed by Dub Pistols)“Our favorite Hamburg label Echo Beach. Since there are only three real albums of the iLLBiLLYs, the King Size represents Dub Spechial edition with no less than 21 tracks represents a considerable part of the total oeuvre of the German band. There are also a number of instrumental and DubVersions, which makes the whole thing interesting for us too. I have to admit, the first time I listened to it, I was a bit stressed by the album's overwhelming energy, but the longer it ran, the more I liked it. In the past few weeks, I've always clicked it when I needed a good mood boost. What can I say: it worked every time. Catchy melodies, smart arrangements, clever sampling, powerful up-tempo beats and the ingenious dramaturgy of the sampler cannot fail. I also love the good old jungle beats that are interspersed here as an intermediate sprint. And the three Dubmatix mixes are terrific again anyway. Oh yes, almost forgot: all the tracks were from the Londoners Dub Pistols overdubbed. I have Original and Overdubb not compared with the magnifying glass, but I can't help but get the impression that the pistols fired with a rather small caliber.

Rating: 4 out of 5.
Categories
Five Star Reggae Review

Radical Vibration: Abaddown

At Steppers, opinions always differ significantly. However, I am completely open-minded in this regard and really appreciate good steppers. I love sound system nights when the bass bursts over the heads of the dancers like storm surges. Nights when body and rhythm become one. A Dub not be repetitive enough at all. What might sound boring on the sofa is just right in the sound system. Only a few beat-makers have mastered the art, this repetitive, meditative, magical Dubs that work so perfectly in the sound system. One of them resides - not in the UK, but in Geneva: Radikal Vibration. The name is program. The four beat producers and sound system operators Sabu, Son'Ja, Robert Safety & Flegus deliver the ultimate hardcore beats, which they decorate with illustrious vocal artists, or give it to the very best. Last year they released the Brother Culture album, Code Name, from which the hit “Jump Up Pon It” emerged. They just started with "Abaddown“(Evidence Music) a second album with various vocalists like King Kong, Mark Wonder, Micah Shemaiah, Teacha Dee, Wayne Smith, Senham Smith and others - but also with four massive ones Dubs after. I'm deeply impressed by that (the emphasis is on "heavy"). Above all Dubs roar in my ears that it is a relief. I would say: This year's Heavy Bass Prize is going - at the last minute - to Switzerland!

Rating: 5 out of 5.
Categories
Five Star Reggae Review

Marcel-Philipp: Morning Sessions, Vol. 1 & 2

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Dub tends to be rather dark music. Magical, mystical, metaphysical - deep and difficult. But how about the complete antithesis to our favorite sound: happy, lively, optimistic music that goes well with a sunny summer morning in the country? Here it is: Marcel-Philipp: "Morning Sessions Vol. 1" and "Morning Sessions Vol. 2" (Ashera Records). The young multi-instrumentalist from Baden-Wuerttemberg presents us with 24 so incredibly lively instrumentals, spread over two albums, that it is pure joy. Anyone who does not feel the sun rise while listening to the “Morning Sessions” must be an incorrigible misanthropist. Its sound reminds me of those Studio One recordings where Jackie Mittoo touched the keys and the groove just poured out. The organ also plays a leading role with Marcel-Philipp - directly after the melodica, the instrument that is inextricably linked with the name Augustus Pablo. The simplicity and childlike innocence inherent in its sound fit perfectly with the simple and therefore all the more beautiful melodies that Marcel-Philipp elicits from it. The arrangement of the instrumentals' up-tempo beats, which are mostly reminiscent of early reggae, is characterized by its simplicity. Anyone who wants to could consider this naive and under-complex. I, on the other hand, tend to just have fun with this thoroughly optimistic music.

Rating 5 stars

Categories
Five Star Reggae Review

Hollie Cook: Twice

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I have to get rid of it: I'm totally flashed by Hollie Cook's new album right now Twice. Such a wacky, cool combination of superb, ultra-tightly produced Ska and Reggae rhythms and Hollie's bright, floating voice - that just makes me happy. And then there are the strings that totally annoyed me with the Trojan productions of the 70s - here they are used congenially. Then there are just great melodies and beautiful, touching lyrics. But the best thing is that Twice designed as a showcase album, so Hollies songs seamlessly into one Dub- Skip version. Great.
That producer Prince Fatty and Hollie Cook are a winning team, they have already proven on Hollie's debut album. On Twice now outdo yourself.
Rating 5 stars

Categories
Five Star Reggae Review

Lee "Scratch" Perry: Back on the Controls

Lee Perry

It's tragic. Whenever I get a new one Lee Perry-Album flutters on the table, I feel more duty than pleasure to listen to it. Lee Perry was once THE innovator of reggae. The originator of a fantastically complex, magical and absolutely unique sound, born from the happy encounter between analog studio equipment, gifted musicians, a lot of marijuana and even more rum with a very special genius that resides in Lee Perry's head (still this side of the border to madness) was. Towards the end of the 1970s, genius crossed this line and Perry became the quirky, babbling owl whose monotonous monologues have since been heard on countless albums by third-rate reggae bands. Bands trying to capitalize on Perry's legendary name to this day. What a crash, what a tragic fate. Now a new attempt: Daniel Boyle - a little-known British reggae producer - had been working with the Madman on a new album for around a year. Before that, he had meticulously bought the equipment from Perry's Black Ark studio and experimented with it until he finally succeeded in what no one had ever done before: reproducing the legendary sound from Perry's prime. Now the new work is available, to which Perry not only contributed the (let's call it) vocals, but which he allegedly co-produced: Lee "Scratch" Perry: Back on the Controls. It's a double showcase album with 11 vocal tunes and 11 DubVersions and, thanks to a successful Kickstarter campaign, is also being released as a CD and beautifully illustrated double vinyl edition. Top or flop? No doubt about it: It catapults itself to the rank of probably the best Perry album of the modern age - a rank, however, which it ranks with Adrian Sherwood's "Dub Setter ”album from 2010. Daniel Boyle (who I hadn't seen before) and Perry have created an official masterpiece here by copying the Black Ark sound, but fortunately foregoing (with one exception) re-brewing the old pieces. Instead, the two of them go their own way, present strong, independent rhythms interspersed with warm brass sections, dose Lee Perry's babbling very appropriately, even elicit some good melodies from him and also offer fantastic melodies as a bonus DubVersions. Perry also seems to have recognized that he has something very special in his hands, which is why he decided to revive his honorable upset label to offer the album a worthy home. Welcome back, Mr. Perry.
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Categories
Reggae Review

Mishmash Vol. 1

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Alpha & Omega have released a new album: The Half That's Never Been Told (Steppas Records). I don't know anyone Dub-Act that's been productive for so many years, like Alpha & Omega. But not only that: they have been so true to their style for around 25 years that it is difficult to distinguish between new albums and re-releases. The Half That's Neve Been Told makes no exceptions: heavy bass, dark rumbling, monotonous - just the way we love it.

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The Resonators have their album The Constant a DubVersion and this together with the original album on a Deluxe Edition (Wah Wah 45s) packed. I already loved the vocal versions. The Dubs make me feel good now.

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I've never had from Dub for Light heard, but the new album Mindset (Dan Dada) then I noticed. Rarely so minimalist Dub belongs. Certainly not my favorite album, but it is definitely an exciting listening experience.

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Not only the son of Augustus Pablo does Dubs, also the son of Jah Shaka, Young Warrior, is in the Dub-Business. For his sound system he has produced several tracks, 6 of which are now instrumentals plus Dub-Versions on the album Presents Dub Box (Jah Shaka) released can be heard. Of course, hardcore steppers, as usual from the father. However, these are quite simple, digital productions that sound like they were recorded in a tin can. In the sound system this is clear, but not on the home hi-fi.

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If more digital Dub, then rather like on the album Mangrove Meets Ganjaman_72 in 5-Track Digital Dub Flight. 1 (Fast Forward Sound). Here, the 8-bit sound à la Jahtari is deliberately played - in a virtuoso manner. The album, the Ganjaman_5, offers 72 tracks by Mangrove in the best Shwocase style DubVersions. Nice.

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As you can often read in the blog: I'm a big, big fan of Prince Fatty. In his row Prince Fatty vs. he now competes against Mungo's Hi Fi (= Prince Fatty vs. Mongo's Hi Fi (Mr. Bongo)). What fun! Not much with me Dub To do, it's still a terrific old-school album in the style of the digital dancehall of the early 1990s. Absolutely suitable for those times Dub-Blow bass debris out of your ears.

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Where we are currently with non-Dub-Albums are: Chronixx Debut Dread & Terrible I really like (Chronixx Music). Has an irresistible old school charm and also offers three nice ones Dubs.

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So, I still have one: Various Artists: Dub Tentacles, Vol. 5 (Fresh Poulp). After the last, rather Dubstep-oriented Dub-Tentacles Vol. 4, the net label is now 100% again Dub returned. That's right! With the exception of Du3normal, everyone is gathered here for me Dub-Acts unknown, but I still like their sound. The sampler offers nothing exciting new, but is still worth listening to - especially since it is available for download free of charge: http://www.fresh-poulp.net/releases/fpr070/

Categories
Reggae Review

Ruts DC: Rhythm Collision Vol. 2

Ruts DC

1982 met the British ex-punk band Ruts DC the crazy professor in his Ariwa studio for the first time and there recorded the album “Rhythm Collision Vol. 1”, which has been mixed up and down there since the label Echo Beach was founded. Now, 31 years after this work, the remaining Ruts men have knocked on Mad Professor again for a new one Dub- Produce album. Prof. Neil Fraser should have been very happy about this (as was Echo Beach), because even after more than three decades, the legendary name of the Ruts should still be able to mobilize a group of buyers beyond the regular reggae audience. The professor was probably less pleased that his very own profession, namely the mix of the album, was not in demand at all. Prince Fatty was supposed to do this job. Now lies the promising work, "Rhythm Collision Vol. 2“(Echo Beach), finally before - and it didn't go bad at all. Okay, enthusiasm sounds different. Ultimately, it's a matter of taste. It feels more like an instrumental album to me. It's nowhere near as deep as I think modern Dub-Album, on the other hand, it's not as playful as I think Prince Fatty can be. Instead of pure rhythm & sound, the Ruts DCs rely on classic song structures and authentic band sound. And you can't complain: the songs are mostly really good and the guest vocalists (Tenor Fly, Molara, Aynzli Jones and others) are very good across the board. Of course there are good ones too Dubs. The track "Sun and Stars" is such a case. Wonderfully deconstructed, detoxified and puristically mixed by Prince Fatty. Also a great old schoolDubwhich sounds as if Scientist had been sitting in the studio with Augustus Pablo, is the track "Heavyweight Style". I would have wished for more of that.

My verdict: 31 years later - here it is: the new album from ex-punk-band Ruts DC. More instrumental than pure dub. But the songs are nice.
My rating: 6 (out of 10)
Check it out: Juno

Categories
Reggae

David Rodigan on the BBC

Rodigan

I owe my reggae socialization in large part to a man: David Rodigan. In the 1980s he sent his two-hour radio show "Rodigans Rockers" to the living rooms of local reggae fans via BFBS. After that, it was part of the Kiss FM program for a long time, but it could not be received in Germany. After Kiss had postponed his reggae show to increasingly unattractive slots (it ended up being Sunday night at midnight), Rodigan announced and signed on to the BBC. Today his new show ran for the first time. Here in Germany you can follow it on the internet - and if you miss it, you can catch up on it on the BBC website. Memories are awakened. Welcome back!
Rodigan on BBC 1Xtra

Categories
Reggae

Dreadsquad: The Riddim Machine Versions

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In the meantime, excellent reggae is emerging almost everywhere in Europe: France, England, Italy, Germany: all great reggae nations. Poland is also one of them. A producer from Lodz alone takes the credit for this: Marek Bogdanski aka Dreadsquad! Since 2001 he has been screwing together some wonderful, energetic rhythms that are musically located somewhere between Ska, Early Reggae and Dancehall. Over time, they have been voiced by a variety of European and Jamaican artists (Ward 21, Tenor Fly, Top Cat, General Levy, U Brown, Milion Stylez, Lady Chann, Tipa Irie, Jah Mason, Perfect, Dr Ring Ding) and in In the form of a few solo albums and many singles (which, however, were compiled into one-rhythm samplers) Last year, “The Riddim Machine” was a Best Of Dreadsquad that I ran in continuous rotation for a long time. Well, a year later, no, unfortunately not the right one appears DubAlbum, but “only” a version album, with the largely unmixed rhythms. It is appropriately titled “The Riddim Machine Versions” (Superfly Studio Poland) - and what can I say: I'm loving it! Great instrumentals, which it is not surprising that they inspired the artists mentioned above to create excellent songs. In addition to original compositions, you can also hear great reworkings by riddims like Sleng Teng or Stalag. That is fun! Now I'm just waiting for that DubAlbum - or optionally on new material. Mainly supplies from the east.
Audio sample at Juno

Categories
Reggae

Studio One Ironsides

Studio One Ironsides

I love the music from Coxson's Studio One. But unfortunately, unfortunately, I've heard my nice, not so small Studio One collection so often in the course of my more than thirty years of passion for reggae that the songs - no matter how fantastic - no longer appeal to me. But now the soul jazz label, which in recent years has made a great contribution to the processing of the Studio One catalog, has released an album whose appeal I have completely succumbed to: “Studio One Ironsites”. Although the album also contains some of the great Studio One classics, it mixes them so cleverly with rare, almost unheard material that for me it amounts to a rediscovery of good old Studio One.
Audio sample on iTunes