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Review

Dennis Bovell meets Dubblestandart: @ Repulse "Reggae Classics"

About Paul Zasky's under the Dubblestandart label released "Reggae Classics“-Album I already tore my mouth wide and wide at this point. The qualitative difference to the predecessor was too big "Dub Realistic"; incomprehensible the decision to work with the experienced, but musically unsophisticated Firehouse crew. Fortunately, the item appeared on Echo Beach - probably the most recyclable label anywhere. And indeed: The first tracks from "Reggae Classics" celebrated their rebirth on "Dub Me crazy" (see also René Wynand's review) - a compilation for which Paolo Baldini dismantled, dusted and polished the recordings. The result was Dub-Remixes that bar everyone Dubblestandart sterility roar fresh and cheeky through the speakers. The next trick of the label was simply the tapes / files Dubto give up visionists and hope for the best. The man delivered: One wonderful, radical reinterpretation the "reggae classics" in the melancholy direction. Barring any original vocals, instead padded with vocoder effects and elegiac carpets of sound, it leaves the original album far behind.

Can you top that? It is worth a try; So off with the recordings of Dennis Bovell - keyword Matumbi, keyword LKJ. He has now given us something like a third incarnation of the album: "Dennis Bovell meets Dubblestandart @ Repulse Reggae Classics“(Echo Beach), as the bulky title is called, knows how to surprise. Instead of an official one Dub-Version (!) Bovell first sings the tracks in again before he gets to it Dub-Mixing makes. Now, it's really not that Bovell is stepping to the microphone for the first time, but the reviewer's expectations were completely different. And so it happens that the cold, awkward-angular, "Denglish" sounding vocals of Paul Zasky are replaced by the no less strange voice of Bovell. It is raw, downright coarse, brings in a shot of dirty soul, appears awkward in its own way: the ethereal “Fly Me to the Moon” cannot overcome gravity and crashes mercilessly; The revised version of “I'm no Robot” with its new backing vocals also seems strangely out of place and at times almost operetta-like due to Bovell's drifting vibrato baritone. A downgrade to the wood class, so to speak, which doesn’t look good on every track, but gives some street credibility: Culture’s “Jah Jah See dem a Come” or Steel Pulse’s “Babylon the Bandit” undoubtedly win.

The vocal tracks are more of a general store or - if you will - a € 1 shop: not everything is of the same quality, not everything keeps what it promises, some things are overpaid even with one euro. Of course, this does not apply to them Dub-Mixes that still need to be discussed, but do not require many words: They are quite successful to excellent; here Dennis Bovell is beyond any doubt, here he can Dub-Master seem: nice earthy, old-school and calm, that's exactly what you expect from the man. That's why there's an unreserved purchase recommendation. What you do with the sung addition is up to you - I put it under "musical joke", which I dig out every now and then for my pleasure. 

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.
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Review

Dubvisionist: Treasures from the Harddrives

For new work from Dubvisionist I get reflexively curious because Dubs from Felix Wolter would suggest the Netflix algorithm with at least “98% agreement”. The hit rate is therefore that of Biontech. Fortunately, the Hanoverian DubProducer a constant output level of high quality Dubs - and has done so since the 1980s. He and ThaiGrr founded The Vision, a pioneering German reggae band, whose recordings are the basis of some fantastic ones Dub-Albums that Felix created over the years. In recent times he has delivered many compelling ones Dub-Mixes on behalf of Echo-Beach.

Now he has Dub-Wizzard rummaged in his archives and marked "Treasures from the hard drives“Ten exciting but still unpublished ones Dubs promoted to days. Why they had to eke out a purely virtual existence up to now seems completely incomprehensible when listening, because they are presentable in every respect. I am enthusiastic about the sound (the master understands his mastering), the arrangements and of course the mixes. But above all the variety of the track selection. Maybe that's a bonus that comes with it automatically when recordings are compiled from different contexts. The achievement then undoubtedly consists of sucking in to ensure that everything still sounds like one piece. Of the Dubvisionist completed this challenge with flying colors.

Long recipes, in a nutshell: I like the album exceptionally well. While some albums are particularly convincing due to their atmosphere and sound and are predestined to exist in the background, Felix's “Treasures” are ideal for conscious listening. Highly entertaining - 98% guaranteed.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

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Review

Indicates Dubs Meets Vibronics: Highest Principles of Dub

"The Highest Principles of Dub“- I have to admit that this title absolutely catches me. An album with this title has to be heard! This is about the principle - about it Dub-Principle. So not just a few nice ones Dubs, but something fundamental. About something that Dub at the core. And let's be honest: don't we all want to know? Of course we know the ingredients of Dub great and we can usually say exactly which one Dub we like it and which one doesn't. We can even justify it - mostly with taste judgments like “I don't like slack basslines”. But we know why Dub fascinated us so much? Why do we listen to it so much? Why do we fill up record shelves and virtual media libraries with it? Yes, why have we invested a lot, a lot of money in it in our lifespan? No, we don't know. The origin of our passion remains unknown to us, remains a mystery. Can we tell us “Highest Principles of Dub“By Indica Dubs Meets Vibronics Enlighten? Can this work make us the principle of Dub lead that finally lets us see what Dub and where does our passion originate? Well, whoever is on solid sound systemDub stands, he could come to a knowledge here, because the ones presented here14 Dub- Principles show where the hammer hangs in the sound system. Sukh - former protégé of Dougie Conscious - got together with him and formulated the principles. It is logical that it is not about variations and current fashions, but about the fundamentals. This is why we are dealing with ultra-orthodox UKDub to do - not to say: with steppers! I know that im here steppers dubblog is sometimes a catchy word. Sorry! But STEPPERS has to be like here with Sukh and Dougie: hard, straight, uncompromising, deep and fast. But with a sense of proportion! The two don't overdo it. The structure remains clearly recognizable, there are melodies and arrangements - and yes, even the mix has a certain dramaturgy inherent in it. I still don't know why I am Dub love - but i know i love this Dubs love.

Rating: 4 out of 5.
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Five Star Review

KMFDM: In Dub

There is music that literally makes you sit up and take notice. A few weeks ago my daughter asked whether I "KMFDM: In Dub“(Metropolis Records) would know; I absolutely have to listen to the album once - after tons of heavy sounds from early childhood, she knows her "old man" too well. And what shall I tell you? The “In Dub“Is one of those again Dub- Curiosities that have always cast a spell on me.

KMFDM was founded in 1984 by Sascha "Käpt'n K" Konietzko as a performance art project in Hamburg, moved its headquarters to Chicago in 1991 and has been successful in industrial metal / industrial rock for over 36 years. None other than the ON .U sound mastermind Adrian Sherwood, who has been exploring the endless possibilities of the Dub-Musik, produced the KMFDM album "Don't Blow Your Top" in 1988 and continued with its mixture of industrial, rock, Dub creative standards again.

About the album itself, “Käpt'n K” said in an interview: “The idea of ​​a Dub-Making a plate had been brewing for a number of years. I just never found the time to sit down and tackle the project. Some of my earliest musical influences were Dub and reggae and I did the project really old school. The dismantling of the original tracks and the brass arrangements were a lot of fun for me. In doing so, I found out that songs are at 125 BPM too dubben is not so ideal. It worked best with the slow and really fast tracks. ”That sounds very interesting. So I got down to the album and delved into the matter. “Käpt'n K” has reinterpreted twelve songs that span their entire career. Already after the first full rimshot on the snare at "Dub Light “I knew that this was an album to my liking. I would never have dreamed that this groovy and rocking source material would be so skillfully integrated Dubcostume transfer. Lucia Cifarelli sings “Everything Old Is New Again” on “Real Dub Thing ”and thus perfectly defines the power of“ In Dub". KMFDM hymns are reinterpreted and garnished with a hodgepodge of meditative grooves with groovy guitar passages, high-pitched horns, intense organ sounds and heavy bass lines, as on “A Dub Against War "," Hau Dub"," Bumaye "presented. With “Bumaye” I mean to hear a sequence with Nina Hagen's voice.
All in all, an album that is bursting with ideas and yet Dubheads will polarize. Quote from a fan: “My girlfriend likes reggae, but KMFDM not so much. Now she likes KMFDM too ”. For ON .U Sound Addicts from the very beginning, “KMFDM: In Dub“An easy exercise and access to those seldom heard sounds may be a little easier.

Rating: 5 out of 5.
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Review

The Archives: Carry Me Home Dub

A year ago the highly acclaimed original "Carry Me Home: A Reggae Tribute to Gil Scott-Heron and Brian Jackson" from The Archives was released. A big budget production by Eric Hilton (one half of Thievery Corporation) and Darryl “Trane” Burke. Superbly rehearsed, recorded and marketed reggae retro sound. the Dub-Version was only a matter of time. Now it is available: "Carry Me Home Dub“By The Archives (Montserrat House). The big budget can be heard with every note. Everything is just right in terms of sound. And yes, of course it is more real Dub, although it is not uncommon for vocals to be heard. But the music has nothing to do with sound system nights. It wants to be played on Sunday mornings at breakfast or at a neat - but cool - dinner. It is about "sophisticated" Dub, tasteful and stylish. But all too often there is also a bit of boredom inherent in “high-quality” works. Everything is calculated, appropriate and balanced, reflective and intellectual. There is simply a lack of what is fun: hard contrasts, surprising, sometimes disruptive ideas, courage and daring. So I'm not sure how to rate the album. It is undoubtedly of absolutely high quality, but I don't have much fun listening to it. Phew! Maybe I just lack the level.

Rating: 3 out of 5.
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Review

The Return of Pachyman

Retro reggae is (almost) always very popular. Many producers struggle to reproduce the sound of the Black Ark, the early Revolutionaries or Channel One. Pachyman fits in seamlessly there. The Puerto Rican, who lives in Los Angeles, is based on the sound of the late 1970s and offers a fresh one, characterized by small melodies and lively rhythms Dub-Style. He plays all of the instruments himself in his basement studio - you can watch some nice videos on YouTube.

My colleague gtkriz once criticized Pachy's sound harshly: “He presents a sound image that gives the impression of being with the artist in a rather musty, dull rehearsal room that is padded for sound insulation. Nothing is embellished there; the loud hi-hat and the cymbals sound tinny, the bass drum and the bass are dry and flat. ”Well, where he's right, he's right. But the question is: Is that really to be assessed so negatively? Or should retroDub doesn't sound like that? If you answer yes to the last question, then of course the follow-up question immediately follows: Why the copy when there is the original? Which brings us to the philosophical proseminar. That's why I don't want to go into any further detail here, but simply announce: I like his new album "The return oh Pachyman“Exceptionally good. the DubIt's wonderfully playful, the melodies nestle in my ears and the mix makes for good entertainment. And yes: I also enjoy deciphering the many quotations. I get the feeling that Pachyman and I are “one of an kind”. That's why I like him, I like to watch him in his basement studio and hear "Return ..." when I'm in a good mood. Welcome back Pachy!

Rating: 4 out of 5.
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Five Star Review

Gladiators: The Time Is Now Discomixes

The Gladiators are undoubtedly a veteran of reggae history and their musical roots can be traced back to Clement “Sir Coxsone” Dodd's Studio One. My first encounter with their music was only in the mid-1970s. Their then producer Tony Robinson had made a deal in Europe and so the first (regular) albums of the Gladiators appeared on Virgin Records. Albert Griffiths died on December 15.12.2020, 74 at the age of XNUMX after a long illness of Parkinson's. The head of the trio with classic harmony vocals à la Wailers, Culture, Abyssinians, Israel Vibration, Meditations, Mighty Diamands etc. has the appearance of the "Gladiators: The Time Is Now Discomixes“(Tabou1) and I can imagine that he was very happy with the end result. Dartanyan "GreenLion" Winston, a young American sound tinkerer in his early 30s from Ohio, has chosen a few tracks from the almost inexhaustible repertoire of the Gladiators and created wonderfully classic discomixes. Eight original songs are skilfully deconstructed and reconstructed with a ton of energy, studio and mixer magic. Dartanyan "GreenLion" Winston pulls out all the stops and delivers a wonderfully sparkling sound bath of vocals, echo, reverb and delay. My highlights, the eight-minute title, are: "Fussing and Fighting" - a Marley song that most clearly shows how much Albert Griffiths' voice resembled Bob Marley's - and "Dreadlocks your Time is now" of course. The album cover gives the impression that it was created under the influence of psychoactive or even more hallucinogenic substances in the hippie era. Even if I had made a slightly different selection of songs, “The Time Is Now Discomixes” is, in retrospect, a wonderful homage to the wonderful gladiators who, undeservedly, were always a bit off the side of the really big vocal trios.

Rating: 5 out of 5.
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Five Star Review

Jallanzo: Dubam 'It & Luvin' It

It always says that it is in Jamaica Dub just about to die. But then the intensive care patient still twitches every now and then and makes everyone present in a state of excitement. Most recently on Teflon Zincfence's album "Dub Policy ". Now another shock wave is going through the intensive care unit: Jallanzo publishes with "Dubam 'It & Luvin' It“A great one Dub-Album made in Jamaica. Jallanzo ?? I didn't know his name yet, but I did know his music, because the multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, singer and Dub-Producer played for the a few years ago Dubtonic Kru, whose music I really appreciated. So now a solo project - in the form of one Dub-Albums! I have no idea who recorded the tracks here, whether they are secondary use or from the outset as Dubs were planned. I only know: you sound breathtaking. So crisp, powerful and dynamic that they would be a pleasure, even if it weren't for the perfect timing, the beautiful melodies, the ingenious arrangements and the inspired mix. Everything is just right here - except for the ugly cover. One reason to forego vinyl. The title of the album comes from a quote from Jallanzo: “Music is my life, my life is my music and I am dubbing it and loving it ”. Jallanzo has dedicated himself to music since he was 13 years old. He mainly works as a studio musician and can be heard on the productions of many well-known artists. Let's hope that we will be able to enjoy his music in the future even without vocals in the foreground.

Rating: 5 out of 5.
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Five Star Review

Dub Spencer & Trance Hill: Black Album

The Zurich Dub-Combo Dub Spencer & Trance Hill is in dubblog a regular guest. Their albums usually get 5 out of 5 stars, which is the highest rating. If a friend points out a “previously officially unpublished, only known to a small circle” work that has appeared on YouTube via Twitter, then of course you will listen carefully. Since September 2020 the "Black album“Apparently online there and has so far reached a good 800 listeners. So it remained an insider tip and raised even more questions for it. Indeed: What is this “Black Album” about?

Band bassist and manager Marcel “Masi” Stalder sheds light on the matter on request. Around the time of “Riding Strange Horses” (2010) Nicolai Beverungen worked for his record label Echo Beach - wherever Dub Spencer & Trance Hill publish their stuff - the idea of ​​an Echo Beach anniversary album had with verdubGood versions of well-known songs, to which the people of Zurich should also make a contribution. Because at that time Stalder and colleagues had so much fun recording strange songs dubTo put on a nice dress, they suddenly recorded around a dozen tracks with the idea of ​​releasing them as a separate album. The problem: The rights were not available for all songs. Therefore, the album disappeared in the drawer - with the exception of one song that made it onto the aforementioned "Riding Strange Horses", which was only equipped with cover versions: "Enter Sandman" by Metallica.

The rest of the "Black Album" found the light of the public in a different way. For one thing, it offered Dub Spencer & Trance Hill to their fans after concerts on self-burned CDs; However, it was a very small edition of only around 100 pieces. On the other hand, Echo Beach brought out a best of the Zurich band in 2017 with “Return Of The Supervinyl”. As the name suggests, only on vinyl, but with a treat - a link to the "Black Album", which was never officially released. Because the activation of the link was only possible in a roundabout way and required a lot of nerve, the vinyl edition was quickly sold out, the ominous work was still reserved for a small group of interested people. Until it was uploaded to Youtube almost a year ago. Presumably from a fan.

Now that the winding paths of the “Black Album” have been clarified, the most important question still arises: Is it worth listening to the ten songs on it? Absolutely - if you are on verdubbte cover versions are available! Marcel Stalder explains with a laugh that every member of the band has brought in his “youthful sins”, his “musical hateful love”. What Dub Spencer & Trance Hill made it out of it is - once again - simply great. Even “The Final Countdown” by Europe (the original causes me physical pain personally) is an experience. In contrast to “Riding Strange Horses”, the original voices are missing on the “Black Album”. But it doesn't matter. That was the only way James Brown's “I Feel Good” could turn out so spooky and gloomy. Nothing more is revealed, except that one likes to put up with such youthful sins. The album fits in seamlessly with the early work of Dub Spencer & Trance Hill one. It is not difficult to read from the previous lines that the writer would like an official publication at a later date.

Tracklist:

1. "Enter Dubman "(" Enter Sandman "by Metallica)

2. "The Final Dub Down "(" The Final Countdown "from Europe)

3. "Eye Of The Lion" ("Eye Of The Tiger" by Survivor from the "Rocky IV" soundtrack)

4. "Bomb Back" feat. Nya ("Bomb Track" by Rage Against The Machine)

5. "Chilly Jean" ("Billie Jean" by Michael Jackson)

6. "Tire" ("Fire" by Jimi Hendrix)

7. "I Feel Stoned" ("I Feel Good" by James Brown)

8. "Owner Of A Dub Heart “feat. The Homestories ("Owner Of A Lonely Heart" by Yes)

9. "The Sea" ("The Ocean" by Led Zeppelin)

10. "Until The End Of The Disc" ("Until The End Of The World" by U2)

Rating: 5 out of 5.
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Five Star Review

International Observer: Bat

(This text has been machine translated.) I'm slowly running out of words of praise. I've already written my fingers sore about the works of International Observer - behind which the lead singer of the historic Thompson Twins, Tom Bailey, hides. I love his relaxed Dubs beyond measure. What fascinates me most is that on the one hand they are incredibly relaxed, but on the other hand they are extremely exciting. It's a crazy paradox. Who knows reggae and Dub from New Zealand, can guess what I mean by that: Perfectly timed rhythms full of groove and inner tension, presented in slow motion. Fascinating. Tom Bailey also knows his trade. His tracks are superbly produced: crisp, dynamic, full-sounding. And then there is the ingenious arrangement, the fantastic bass lines and the wonderful, colorful, shimmering melodies. Everything from the mix interwoven into a large, comprehensive, multi-layered euphony.

There is actually no category or the dubs by Tom Bailey. It is undoubtedly one hundred percent reggae-dub technical perfection, which at the same time has completely emancipated itself from reggae. Crazy, right? Tom has created a completely independent dub-style that admittedly makes use of the reggae aesthetic, but otherwise leaves genre conventions behind. No “Yeah” exclamations, no sirens, no steppers, no historical basslines or brass sections - observer Dubs are utterly themselves, without quotes and superficial references. That's why I can't even imagine his music at a sound system event, even with the best of intentions. Unthinkable! But it would be perfect for a New Zealand pop open air festival.

The meticulousness of the productions also explains why the Observer only sporadically releases new EPs (let alone complete albums). Here quality comes before quantity. "Bat“ (Dubmission) is his latest work. After “Mink” and “Pangolin” it is the third EP in the “animal series” - and this is of course as excellent as all other works of this extraordinary dub-protagonist.

Rating: 5 out of 5.