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Review

Ras Teo: Ion Man in Dub

What do you expect from an album where Lone Ark, Zion High and I Grade (read: Roberto Sanchez, David Goldfine and Laurent Alfred) shake hands? Pretty much the ultimate Roots grenade - especially since it's the new release from Ras Teo, which is now appreciated by the reviewer and - as you can hear - in the community. And the piece also comes with the finest artwork: a classic portrait of the Emperor of Ethiopia - when was the last time you saw something like this in such a beautiful presentation?

So first of all: Ras Teo's new release "Ion Man in Dub(Forward Bound Records) and the corresponding vocal album “Ion Man” definitely meet the high expectations: The production is A1 - not softened like some newer I-grade productions, but nice and catchy; It uses classical-looking arrangements and has extras such as fine brass sections and wonderful transverse flute passages. Also David Goldfine's more dynamic Dub-Mix is ​​solid craftsmanship - without any forward-looking gimmicks, but with an echo that is used abundantly and couldn't be more precise; The reverb supports the appropriate passages in a well-dosed manner. In short: In terms of production alone, the whole thing would be a case for a 5-star review if... yes, if it weren't for the fade-outs. They're probably a no-go now, who still does them? Just at Dub-Tunes, fade-outs are a disgrace when there are plenty of effects available to help you dubto set a big final chord. So please: This really doesn't have to be the case anymore.

We are dealing with this here Dub, but I still want a shout for the vocal album “Ion Man“ (Forward Bound Records): It's not just Ras Teo's velvety vocals that have developed further - note the wonderfully layered backing vocals; His songwriting has also reached a new level and is already approaching that of Ijahman Levi approach. An impressive example is the track “Hard Fe Ketch”, which could just as easily have appeared on an Ijahman album. Here too: 5 star material if... yes, if there weren't the unpopular fade-outs again, see above: No-go.

The bottom line is that we are dealing with two fine roots albums that are addictive and which the reviewer feels are currently playing around the clock. “Ion Man in Dub“Unfortunately, it is currently only available to a limited extent via bandcamp; The vocal album “Ion Man”, on the other hand, received the big release and can be found on virtually all digital platforms. All thumbs up for both releases - but a small star deduction for the above inconvenience.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.
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Review

Youthie & Macca Dread: Gecko Tones

Youthie and Macca Dread are setting new standards with their new album “Gecko Tones(Youthie Records) seamlessly picked up where they left off with “The Roots Explorers”, which in turn picked up where the two had previously left off with “Nomad Skank”. This continuity should not be misunderstood as stagnation. The multi-instrumentalist Youthie and the riddim maker Macca Dread simply continue their collaboration at the same high level. The 44 tracks on the three albums could have been created in a single extended session. I already suspect it: my words cannot be read without a slight criticism, as there is often a general expectation that everything must constantly develop and improve. But for us friends of Dub one thing is clear: good things remain. And you really have to give credit to the two French guys: what they do is really, really good. A change could jeopardize this status of perfection. That's why I'm grateful that Macca Dread produced just as powerful rhythms for "Gecko Tones" as they did for the previous albums and that Youthie delivers their instrumental playing in a way that couldn't be more congenial. In every note you can hear that Juliette Bourdeix aka Youthie, who was classically trained on the trumpet, has not only mastered her craft, but has internalized reggae to the core. Your trumpet, occasionally also a flute or accordion, does not play bluntly over the rhythms - as is often heard on reggae instrumental albums - but WITH them. Youthie feels the vibe of reggae in a way that only a true lover of the genre can, weaving her playing with the beats into an inseparable unit. Youthie and Macca Dread have created true instrumental “songs” in which rhythms and lead instruments complement each other perfectly and interact with each other. The result is completely coherent instrumental pieces that you don't hear too often in reggae. It's also clever how Youthie changes instruments from track to track, thus providing a lot of variety. It also evokes musical styles from different cultures, which makes the listening experience of the album a little journey that takes us primarily to Eastern Europe in the Balkans. She always finds beautiful melodies that shape her pieces and make them unique. But Youthie's music couldn't work its magic without Macca Dread's absolutely brilliant productions. He also manages to compose varied tracks, which he records entirely in analogue form himself and produces them in a dynamic, crisp sound. Anyone who still complains about the fact that there is no “real” Dub-Mix should stand in the corner and be ashamed.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.
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Review

Menotti HiFi: YKSI

There's a new kid on the block: Menotti HiFi. Three musicians from Münster, Thomas Hoppe (drums), Gudze (bass) and Arne Piri (keyboard) form the trio, two of which were already members of the Senior Allstars. After three years of jam sessions, experimentation and sound discovery, they are now presenting their debut album: “YKSI” (Vinyl Only Records). The name and origin of the band refer to Dub – and yet the three don’t see each other as “Dub Act”. They sound (by their own admission) as if the Beastie Boys were recording an instrumental album in Lee Perry's Black Ark Studio. Since the Beastie Boys famously didn't play reggae, it should be clear that we're dealing with a sound pretty much on the fringes of the genre - which can be quite refreshing. To me it sounds like rock and breakbeat, played and processed according to the concept of Dub. Difficult to describe in more detail and equally difficult to evaluate because of the lack of clear references. It's best if you listen for yourself.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.
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Review

Thriller featuring Augustus Pablo

The fact is: reggae visionary and pioneer Augustus Pablo was instrumental in the emergence of the burgeoning band with his unique sound Dub-Reggae scene involved. Augustus Pablo is said not to have been enthusiastic about an early album. It was released in England in 1975 on the Nationwide label and the cover read: “Thriller featuring Augustus Pablo“, produced by Enos McLeod. There have been several questionable releases of the album over the years. For all of them the “featuring” disappeared and it became “Augustus Pablo: Thriller” or “Augustus Pablo: Pablo Nuh Jester”, with a changed track order and five additional titles – which I will briefly discuss at the end. When re-released by Canadian label Abraham/Clocktower, both the album's original title and all tracks were renamed. So pay attention: “Augustus Pablo: Dubbing In A Africa” is “Thriller”.
The vinyl re-release on Black Friday (25.11.2022/1.400/25,99), made possible by ORG Music on Record Store Day (RSD), sold out XNUMX copies in the United States in a very short time, priced at $XNUMX each. With this long overdue new edition, Augustus Pablo posthumously made it into the Billboard Reggae Album Charts for the first time.

Even if Augustus Pablo had a different opinion: “Thriller” is an outstanding album that contains some of the best work by the exceptional musician and producer who died far too early outside of his joint projects with King Tubby. A work that Enos McLeod can be proud of as a producer. It is still unclear what he actually produced. In any case, he didn't produce “Last Of The Jestering”, which is clearly Leonard Chin's fault. The same goes for “Pablo Nuh Jester”, another piece with the same rhythm. Of the remaining eight tracks, “Fat Girl Jean” can definitely be marked off as Pablo’s work. The sound of the piano makes me think so, because only Pablo seems to be able to make a piano produce that sound. The melodica tracks leave no doubt about it anyway.

The A-side of the vinyl begins with the title track “Thriller,” which features a great trombone part while a super-slow bassline floats over cymbal-heavy drums.
On "Pablo in Red" Augustus' melodica takes center stage and a rock-solid bass makes its way through the speakers.
“Pablo Style” is a slow, melodica-led instrumental version of the Ken Boothe classic “Everything I Own.”
“Last of the Jestering” is a difficult one Dubversion with clanging drums, and Augustus plays the main melody just great on his melodica. Patti Smith liked to play a slightly stripped down version of the song at her concerts.
My personal favorite has always been the B-side of this collector's item. It begins with “Pablo Nuh Jester,” a much more straightforward version of “No Jestering,” a 1973 song by Carl Malcolm.
“Fat Girl Jean” follows, a booming bass and slow drums are caressed by a gentle melodica.
“Marcus Garvey” turns the old Burning Spear classic into a real treat with its much faster rhythm and Augustus Pablo inspires me every time I listen to this piano-led instrumental version.
In "Rocky Road" Augustus shows what wonderful sounds he can elicit from his melodica, while the guitar is occasionally used. Two other versions of the Burning Spear Studio One classic “Foggy Road” are called “Rocky Road” and “Skibo Rock”. In my opinion, both pieces can also be attributed to Pablo. This time due to the very pronounced clavinet/keyboard work in “Skibo Rock”. The faster, almost dancefloor-friendly “Skibo Rock” is the culmination of a long-forgotten killer album.
Like many albums from this time, the sound is a bit dull, but the bass booms and the drums rattle so incredibly beautifully. To my ears, the warm, almost gentle sound of the album creates an airy and at the same time hypnotic listening pleasure.

Note: The last five Dubs on the CD have nothing to do with “Thriller” and are credited to Lloyd Parks & We The People Band.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.
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Review

Ras Teo & I David: Bredda Daniel in Dub

Good albums always make a comeback - or, as in this case, a proper release on all notable streaming channels. So far Ras Teo and I have had David's Dub-version of their 2015 release "Bredda Daniel“ She spent a few years more or less hidden in the band camp catacombs; but now “Bredda Daniel in Dub“ (Akashic Records), obviously not just visually spruced up and polished, lifted into the well-deserved light of Spotify & Co. The streaming money tap per se has pretty little pressure, but in contrast to the easily infiltrated bandcamp offer, it trickles away day in and day out, and we would like to give Ras Teo and I David that credit.

The two are a well-rehearsed team: “Bredda Daniel” was their first collaboration, followed by the “Timeless” album and several other releases, preferably in single format. There's not much to lose here about Ras Teo himself - that's for the interested reader dubblog review of his fine Roberto Sanchez-produced “Ten Thousand Lions“album is recommended. However, it should be added that my relationship with Ras Teo's voice - thanks to his numerous other releases - is now more positive. I now also have a lot of respect for the fervor with which he presents his deeply religious texts, which often seem like they were taken directly from the Tanakh. There is no veering into shallower waters of worldly topics - the man knows the Holy Scriptures, lets the world know it and is reminiscent of the 1970s, when roots reggae was still on a first-name basis with the Bible.

I David, on the other hand, is at home in the studio and seemingly constantly produces tracks - sometimes with a live roots feeling, sometimes with a digital jackhammer. When working with Ras Teo, he chose the former - thank God - especially since the sterile digi sounds never suited the singer particularly well - see Ras Teo's first albums. He is also responsible for the mix of “Bredda Daniel in Dub“, to which he gave an extra pinch of bass in contrast to the vocal album, which was rather weak in this regard. 

That's good, no question, but it could be a little more for my taste. Otherwise there's very little to complain about: more classic Dub with beautiful, no less classic effects - one more album that could just as easily have boomed out of the speakers back in the day. It fits, sits, lasts, is fun and is definitely worth recommending.

PS: If you want to get into more melodica, you can find many of the “Bredda Daniel” tracks on I David’s instrumental “Roots Radical"-Album.

Rating: 4 out of 5.
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Review

iGL & Alecho: Revolution

Okay, you can really get excited about the fact that “real” sound systemDub has been standing still for 25 years, but you can also be happy about that Dub takes exciting new paths in the vicinity of electronic minimal music. The album is a really nice example of this "Revolution" by iGL & Alecho (Dubphonics). The duo Konstantinos & Alexandra lives and works in Athens, where this album was also recorded. It's unmistakably offbeat-driven Dub, which, however, subtly has one foot in the electronic music genre and cleverly explores the possibilities of crossovers. I particularly like the finely balanced arrangements of the minimalist-looking rhythms. Surprisingly, they are by no means monotonous or even boring, but rather exciting audio pieces - which are worth getting involved with. At the Sound System Clash, no one would think of playing music by iGL & Alecho, but anyone who indulges in contemplation and listens carefully (at best through headphones) will be entertained in an intelligent way. By the way, that doesn't mean that the music lacks power and dynamism. Not at all. The beats are quite impressive - at the right volume. Since the tracks consistently avoid boasting, big pants and aggression, the pleasant impression of real relaxation is conveyed. Very pleasant.

Rating: 4 out of 5.
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Review

Dub Stax

At least since the Easy Star Allstars and Mato we know that everything is different dubben lets: The Beatles, David Bowie, Pink Floyd, Daft Punk, Country & Western, soundtracks, even classical music. And now also soul. The album "Dub Stax” (Echo Beach) by drummer Achim Färber proves it. As is well known, soul and reggae have a common past. Especially during the rocksteady era, almost every US soul release was covered in Jamaica. So it makes sense to approach soul today using reggae means. Even more specific: With Dub-means. The big advantage: Dub reduces the fall height, because compared to a “normal” cover version, it has to Dubversion does not stand up to comparison with the original, but is viewed more as an independent work - which also opens up greater creative scope. “Why not?” thought Achim Färber, currently the drummer for the band Automat, got a few musicians together (!) and started playing and recording classics from the legendary soul label Stax dubben. Interestingly, Färber has hardly had anything to do with reggae so far. His impressive discography lists hundreds of names, including only one, Deadbeat, which I know from the reggae context. This may be why the sound of his recordings is atypical for reggae. But ultimately it doesn't matter, because what matters is the quality of the music - and not what it is comparable to. So let's listen carefully. What strikes you first: the supposed ones Dubs have a fairly large vocal component. Although these are often fragmented and the majority of them are lost in the echo, this still represents the categorization as “Dub“a little questionable. However, there are enough instrumental versions and even explicit ones on the album.Dub Cuts” to the title “Dub Stax” can ultimately be justified. Nevertheless, it would have been more consistent to do without vocals completely. But that may be a subjective judgment of taste on my part, because I like the excessive use of vocal fragments in the Dub not. Because singing inevitably banishes the instrumental music into the background. It becomes “backing” and loses its inherent value and only “serves” the singing. At the Dub But it's exactly about bringing the “backing” to the forefront, putting all the focus on it and letting it work in all its beauty. That's why singing bothers me Dub-Mixes in principle - whereas I love it when one Dub begins with singing, which then, in an act of unscrupulous anarchy and disrespect, is simply cut off in the middle of the word by the engineer and then dissolves into reverb and smoke. Okay, so on this aspect I'm convinced Dub Not Stax. Otherwise there is little to complain about. The interpretations of the Stax classics are truly original. The sound sometimes reminds me of the Senior Allstars, a bit dry, a bit woody, but with a solid groove. The DubHowever, the mix is ​​extremely subtle, a bit too repetitive and generally not really exciting.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.
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Review

Brynovsky: Dub Section

Well, sometimes you have to have the courage to leave a gap, or rather, you really can't know and know everything. This is what happened to me for the second time in a very short time after Andru Branch with Brynovsky. The versatile music maker, independent artist, author and producer Tim Jones aka Brynovsky is, in addition to his alternative folk rock, especially for his Dub- and reggae skills are known. Born in London, he grew up in Derby in the East Midlands, England. Today he lives and works in Scotland.
Even legendary musician and DJ Tom Robinson (band) described Brynovsky as a “great discovery” and twice gave a platform to and introduced the “sweet, sweet sounds of Brynovsky” to his listeners on his BBC6 Music show. What I completely missed: Brynovsky has been used by music professionals for years for his Dub-Arts celebrated.

The latest work from the Scottish sound alchemist and multi-instrumentalist "Brynovsky: Dub Section“takes the listener on a subtle journey Dub-Trip made from the best Dub-Draws on tradition and at the same time looks to the future. In short, Tim Jones has “Dub Section” in the spirit of Dub-Pioneers produced. As an experienced producer and songwriter, Brynovsky has extracted twelve sound fragments from older material and B-takes and given them a rich sound Dub-Missed paint. The result is by no means disappointing, as the Scottish musician always finds the right balance between familiarity and artistic sharpness. A playful and hypnotizing mix of Afro influences, reggae rhythms and trip-hop elements. Brynovsky understood that a... Dub-Instrumental album is not for everyone. Not everyone is brave enough to lose themselves in a sea of ​​expansive, euphoric, expansive, euphoric sound material. Brynovsky is not afraid to delve into the dark, unknown and unconventional Dubuniverse. “Dub Section” is an album that is as eclectic as it is abstract, but still has power and sharpness. It presents 45 minutes of reimagined instrumentals that represent a return to reggae and reggae for indie artist Tim Jones, who has been releasing music under his pseudonym Brynovsky since 2010 Dub mean. In his studio in Scotland he single-handedly records tracks from his back catalog in classical form Dub-Style editing and releasing a track every week on Soundcloud and YouTube until he was able to put it together into a full album in January 2024.
His album »Hard Curves«, which was published back in 2010, I definitely have to mention here. Listen to it, in my ears it is in no way worse than the one discussed here.Dub Section”. For example, “Rumba Queen” is a Dub an outtake from the Hard Curves sessions. “Red Forest” is also from the “Hard Curves” album Dub the original “Into a Dream”, and “CMYK Culture”. Dub of the track “Mischief”.
Most tracks like “Power Vacuum”, “Dub Shining”, “Spycops”, “City of Bytes”, “Peace It Together” are Dub-Interpretations of the 2014 song album “Time Is Now“, which was originally sung with the Jamaican singer Leroy Jones*.

All in all, “Dub Section” is an unusual but very appealing album.

Rating: 4 out of 5.

*Leroy Jones (aka Jah Dave) is a singer, percussionist, producer and member of the Congos, with whom he still tours as a percussionist. He worked with, among others, Gregory Isaacs, Horace Andy, Sugar Minott, Johnny Clarke, Prince Far I and Dub Syndicate. Since 2012 he has been a member of the Scottish reggae hybrid band Brynovsky and also performs solo.
The Jamaican native was a famous jockey in his youth and even beat the great Lester Piggott. When Leroy grew too big to race, he started making music with Congo Ashanti Roy and became a Rasta. In the early 80s he played drums for many major reggae artists as “Jah Dave”. After moving to London he became a producer and singer. Together with Mad Professor he produced Johnny Clarke's "Do I Do I" for his first LP "Yard Style" on Ariwa, which reached number 1 in Jamaica and on the British reggae charts.

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Review

Augustus Pablo: Rockers Meets King Tubbys In A Fire House (Re-Release)

The visionary Jamaican musician Augustus Pablo is one of the most important people in reggae history. In the early 70s, Horace Swaby (bourgeois) attended Kingston College (KC) along with friends such as Clive Chin and Tyrone Downie. His and Tyrone's interest in music had already taken them to a local church, where they practiced diligently on the organ.
The rest of the story is said to have happened something like this: Sometime in 1971, Horace is said to have been on his way to Herman Chin Loy's Aquarius Record Shop in Half Way Tree to buy records for his brother's 'Rockers' sound system. There he received or borrowed a melodica from a girl. While still in the shop, Horace began playing the instrument. Impressed by the unique sound of the melodica, Herman Chin Loy took Horace to his Aquarius Studio the next day. It is also reported that Herman Chin Loy gave Horace Swaby the name Augustus Pablo during this first session. During the first sessions, classics like “Iggy Iggy”, “Invasion” and “East Of The River Nile” were created.
But it wasn't until 1972, when Augustus Pablo teamed up with his old school friend Clive Chin, that he achieved his breakthrough. Pablo enchanted everyone with the great “Java”. The story behind the creation of “Java” is no less exciting: Clive had brought Dennis Wright (another friend of KC) into the studio to record a song they were working on. The basic tracks were already finished, but even after many unsuccessful attempts, the vocal part just didn't work. As they were about to leave the studio disappointed, Pablo approached Clive and asked him to record a version of the song. While listening in the hallway, he had thought of a melodic line that he wanted to play on the melodica. Clive agreed, turned on the tape recorder and they recorded an instrumental version. “Yesssssss!"
This was a rough outline of the beginnings of the legendary Augustus Pablo, who was a significant part of the Dub-He helped write history. Just searching here Dubblog results in 58 entries.

Now we turn our attention to the actual object of the meeting: “Augustus Pablo: Rockers Meets King Tubbys In A Fire House", which was re-released by the French Only Roots label in December 2023. With his early recordings, the talented musician and innovative producer is one of the pioneers of the Dub. His recordings from this period are all considered classics today and were part of the remarkable creative boom that the Jamaican music scene experienced internationally. The Dub-Studio album by Augustus Pablo and King Tubby "Rockers Meets King Tubbys In A Fire House" was first released in 1980 and has been re-released several times since then. Firehouse is an ironic reference to the Waterhouse district of Kingston, where King Tubby's studio was located, or to King Tubby's Firehouse, Waterhouse, Taurus and Kingston 11 labels. The Rockers All Stars with Mickey 'Boo' Richards, Leroy 'Horsemouth' Wallace and Albert Malawi on drums, Robbie Shakespeare on bass and Earl 'Chinna' Smith on guitar created “Jah Say Dub” and “Zion Is A Home” Dubs that can still be heard today. The Dub-Mixes are remixes of the original singles by Pablo's protégés Hugh Mundell aka Jah Levi, Delroy Williams and others. In addition to King Tubby and Augustus Pablo, Prince Jammy also contributed some mixes, but his name does not appear anywhere on the cover. Pablo's sound dominates on "Rockers Meets King Tubbys In A Fire House", even if he has noticeably toned down his trademark melodica. Although the melodica is only used fragmentarily, Pablo's mystical melodies meander through the mix and the gentle but rich grooves that always characterize a Rockers production are present in full force. King Tubby controls the special element of the Dub-Alchemy by using echo and delay at appropriate intervals, keeping the overall atmosphere mysterious and seductive. Due to the nature of the music and its consistently high quality, it is somewhat difficult to pick out highlights. These undoubtedly include the melodica piece “Zion Is A Home” and the equally good, trombone-heavy “Dub in a Matthews Lane Area”, which serves as a lesson in matters Dubtechnology could serve. The Horns are all credited to Felix 'Deadley' Headley Bennet in the credits, which is certainly incorrect. I can only hear his unmistakable sax style in “Short Man Dub“listen out. I also find it worth mentioning the use of the string synth keyboard in “Selassi I Dub“, which Pablo heard for the first time on the “East Of The River NileThe album was used extensively. Pablo seemed to love the sound of this instrument. In contrast to the melodica or clavinet, which he mostly used as a lead instrument, he used the string synthesizer more as a harmony instrument.

Album release note: Interest in Augustus Pablo was at its peak in 1979. His “East Of The River Nile” set and the album “Africa Must Be Free By 1983” by his protégé Hugh Mundell the year before sparked an interest in all things Pablo. Especially in his early productions. The present Deep Roots Dub-Classic originally released in 1980 on Yard (J.A.) & Shanachie (U.S.A.) and Augustus Pablo, like Lee 'Scratch' Perry before him, was no longer in tune with current musical tastes in Jamaica. This may have come as a surprise to some, but with the release of a single record that can change overnight, and that sudden change can be heard on Rockers Meets King Tubbys In A Fire House. The dancehall revolution was ushered in by Henry 'Junjo' Lawes in the fall of 1979. The rebel rock sound of Pablo's Rockers All Stars couldn't be compared to the heavy, dense rhythms of the Roots Radics - there was a world of difference between them. Nevertheless, “Rockers Meets King Tubbys In A Fire House” is and remains for me one of the best Augustus Pablo albums ever, even 44 years after its release.
The re-release comes in the best quality yet. So if you want a beautiful, timeless classic in your record cabinet, you should grab it.

Rating: 4 out of 5.
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Five Star Review

Pinnacle Sound: In Dub, vol. 1

Released in the last few meters of 2023, the album “In Dub, Vol. 1” (Bat Records) from Pinnacle Sound is one of the highlights of the year for me. Okay, I've criticized the retro sound often enough and in fact you can ask yourself how much sense there is in recreating the sound of historical reggae styles. But on the other hand, the historical material is already limited in terms of quantity - not to mention the sound quality. So when new music is created in a historical style, it can easily be dismissed as eclectic or historicist, but at the same time it can be wonderful music. Maybe it would help to delete the “historical” and simply take the style for what it is, without any implicit judgment: a characteristic sound form. So what if we understood “Early Reggae” simply as a musical style with no historical dimension? As well as z. B. Steppers or One Drop? Although the comparison is flawed, it would be a welcome solution to my dilemma that I like Pinnacle Sound's new work so much - even though it is historical early reggae in its purest form. I love the album: the sound is so irresistibly fresh, so energetic and so catchy that it is a pure joy - and any academic discussion about the justification of eclecticism is forbidden. Apart from that, “In Dub, Vol. 1” a quality of Dub, as it did not exist 50 years ago.

My new favorite album has been released on Bat-Records, the small studio and label based in Clermont-Ferrand that, in addition to Pinnacle Sound, also owns Dub Shepherds belong. Both creators of beautiful retro reggae. In the present case Dub album have Pinnacle Sound and the Dub Shepherds worked together congenially, after all it is about them Dub-Version of the Pinnacle album “Soul Medicine” from 2022, which was released at the time by the Dub Shepherds was mixed (and probably also recorded). What could be closer than that? Dub-Mix to put into the hands of the shepherds? And they did a fantastic job. If you wanted to explain what in a music seminar Dub then you would only need the track “Psam 2” from “Dub Medicine” play and then the Dub-Put on the “Psalm 150” version. The seminar could remain wordless, because... Dub gets to the heart of what our favorite music is all about: using the mix to create a completely unique piece of music. The difference between the two psalms – despite the identical material basis – could not be greater.

Even if the psalm is something very special, the album is convincing throughout its entire length. Everyone Dub is a through-composed piece of music with wonderful arrangements, great melodies and good mix ideas that go far beyond the (sparing) use of reverb and echo. A mix that gives the pieces a real dramaturgy - like a meta-arrangement. I'm glad that this album was released in 2023, because in this way I can fervently and with full conviction contradict gtk's thesis that the annual output in 2023 is bad.

Rating: 5 out of 5.