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Review

Digitaldubs: "DigitalDubs # 1 "

That Brazil is a hot spot for Dubs is, we have known not least since the film documentary "Dub Echoes ". It is therefore not surprising that an album is now being released from that beautiful South American country that can effortlessly play in the first division of the genre: “Digital-Dubs # 1 “(Roir) from Digitaldubs. If I didn't know that the album came from the other end of the world, then I would suspect its origin in the UK - sounding so much digitaldubs after the UKDub-Sound of the early 90s. In a concrete comparison, however, the Brazilian ones turn out to be Dubs as much more complex, finely arranged and simply better produced. 20 years of software and studio technology progress must leave traces. So we are dealing with modern, powerful, self-confident and at the same time beautifully melodious Dubs that would not receive an innovation award, but are ideally suited Dubto give friends around 50 minutes of listening pleasure. In addition, digitaldubs the example of many others Dub-Producers (most recently Dubmatix) and don't be stingy with appearances by guest vocalists. We meet veterans like Earl Sixteen (who fits in perfectly here), Ranking Joe and Binsley Forde - as well as two Brazilian artists who perform their lyrics in Portuguese. Very nice. Let's look forward to an early # 2.

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Review

Java Java Java Java

After King Tubby in the early 70s with his Dub-Mixes caused a sensation and the genre "Dub“Put it on the musical map of Jamaica, the first appeared tentatively in 1973 Dub-Albums. Their circulation was so small that they cost three to four times more in a record store than a normal vocal album. Three albums made the start (each of which claims to be the first Dub-Album at all): Lee Perry's “Blackboard Jungle Dub", Mixed by King Tubby, Herman Chin Loys" Aquarius Dub", Probably mixed by himself and: Clive Chin's" Java Java Java Java "(Impact / 17th North Parade), mixed by the second Dub-Genius of those days: Errol Thompson. Given the skills that Thompson displayed in his later collaboration with Joe Gibbs, "Java" is only rudimentarydubt and sounds like a collection of pure instrumental versions. But the instrumentals are tough, because here we encounter the rhythms of classics like “Guiding Star” by the Heptones, “King Of Babylon” by Junior Byles or the great Randy's version of “Swing Easy” with Tommy McCook's saxophone as lead . The most spectacular track on the album, however, is the namesake: "Java", a recut of the classic by Augustus Pablo. Here ET has reached a strong and fascinating one Dub stamped out of the ground, which lives entirely from the sharp contrast between the pure drum & bass track and the clattering sound of the full instrumentation - two modes, between which ET switches back and forth with virtuosity. My favorite is “Ordinary Version Dub“In which Errol Thompson stops the music to expel an unknown troublemaker from the studio. If he then (individually commented) builds up the rhythm again from its components, he becomes - by the way - the originator of the first Dub-Manifestos of music history. Not always common for the releases of 17th North Parade, by the way, the sound quality of the album is excellent. The tracks sound fresh, crisp, voluminous and balanced. The best prerequisites for a renewed hearing, also far beyond a purely historical interest.

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Review

Dub Trio: "IV"

The New Yorker Dub Trio presents with "IV" (Roir) his fifth album (the fourth with producer Joel Hamilton). Starting with the classic, rock-influenced reggaeDub, the trio - consisting of drum, bass and guitar - took a step closer to heavy metal with each release. With IV it has now reached its destination. Although the press information places value on establishing a reference to reggae and speaks of “diversity”, one has to bravely face the truth: the once virtuoso Dub Trio is that Dub has simply been lost. Instead of sound & space there is a merciless guitar massacre. More refined and experimental than the usual mainstream metal bands, but not the least: it's metal. Reggae basslines, one-drop beats or Dub- You won't find any effects. And although I do Dub-Crossovers generally welcome and believe that there is a lot of musical potential in the connection of different styles, so I am still an ardent fan of the reggae beat and understand by "crossover" that at least one mainstay should remain in reggae. I don't mean to disqualify the music of the New York band with that. The Dub Trio definitely doesn't make bad music - it just doesn't my Music.

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Review

Don Corleon “Presents Dub In HD "

Dub Jamaica is known to be a rare species. Now one reaches us Dub-Album from producer Donnovan "Don Corleon" Bennett: "Don Corleon Presents Dub in HD “(Don Corleon Records). Bennett, whose career began about ten years ago with the production of tough dancehall tunes, turned in 2005 to what he himself describes as the "modernist interpretation of the one drop beat". This is a series of modern roots rhythms that helped singers like Sizzla, Jah Cure, TOK, Luciano, Bounty Killer and of course Gentleman to achieve respectable hits. Ten of these rhythms - the best known are probably "Drop Leaf", Major "and" Seasons "- are now mixed by the Don himself (how can be seen here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zohLYV6ncNg&feature), first Dub-Album from the House of Don Corleon ”. In the interview, Bennett stated that he did Dub-Mixing from the great masters of the genre - Tubby, Scientist, Jammy, Mad Professor - learned by watching YouTube videos! May it be because of this learning method or because modern Jamaican rhythms are fundamentally not suitable for Dubs are suitable (maybe it's because of both), the "Dubs in HD ”are not particularly convincing. Somehow they sound inanimate, sterile, constructed and the mix always remains predictable, stereotypical, even boring. The recorded vocal fragments by Buju Banton, Tarrus Riley, Jah Cure, Protoje, Natural Blacks and Jah9 don't help either: the tracks can't grab the listener's attention. There is one exception, however, and that is at the very end of the album: “Wrong Side In Dub“By Protoje. Here we have an exciting rhythm and mix that was pretty heavily inspired by Mad Professor. So should be more modern Dub sound from Jamaica - not just a track at the end of an otherwise harmless album.

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Reggae Review

Dubmatrix: Clash Of The Titans

I can't help but Dubmatix is ​​my hero. I'm totally into his productions - and especially his Dub-Productions. When his album "System Shakedown" came out last year, on which he almost exclusively presented vocal tracks, he consoled me with the prospect of the "System Shakedown" remixes, which are now finally under the title "Clash Of The Titans" ( Collision / Irie Ites) have appeared. The lineup of remix artists reads like a who's who Dub- Art: G. Corp, Zion Train, Victor Rice, Nate Wize, Alldub, Vibronics, Felix Wolter - to name just a few. They offer us the complete spectrum of the pure Dub-Mix up to completely new instrumentation, from roots to jungle, Dubstep and technoid sounds to global sounds. Compared to "System Shakedown", the Clash of the Titans is much more electronic, dubBigger and more experimental, which - in my ears - makes things even more interesting. A good example of what happens on “Clash Of The Titans” is the track “Struggle” (feat. Dennis Alcapone). in the Dubmix-original it is a massive stepper with eighty percent vocal content. A powerful, dubbig song with clear references to the UKDub. There are two versions of the piece on the remix album. One is from Dubmatix himself, who really pushed the tube here and accelerated the fast steppers beat by adding more drum tracks. The sound sounds fatter (which could be due to the better mastering) and the part is now a real one (despite Alcapone's vocals) Dub-Piece become. Al goes one betterdubb, which provides the second cut of the piece here. If his Dubstep wobble bass sets in, then there is right to be concern about the state of health of the woofers. The Berlin producer and Dub-Mixer did exactly what Remix (and Dub) in the real sense is: namely the uncompromising concentration on the pure form. He took her to extremes here. The remix has to go beyond the original per se, has to surpass it in at least one respect, has to resort to extreme means in order to have a right to exist. And since this is the case consistently on “Clash Of The Titans”, I swing myself to the conclusion that the “System Shakedown” remix album is actually even better than the original.

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Review

Big Finga & Aldubb: "Big Dubb "

A surprising number of them landed in the last few weeks Dub-Albums either on my desk or in the download folder. The album that I always prefer to pick out of this pile and put on is “Big Dubb “(One Drop) by Big Finga and Aldubb. The story of this album begins with Josie "Bigfinga" Coppola, the drummer of the gentleman-backing band "The Evolution", who, when he is not on stage behind his drums, also works as a producer and engineer. For two years he worked on his first big project, an album, recorded by the band Feueralarm and voiced by artists such as Luciano, Joseph Cotton, Sugar Minott, Chezidek. With these tracks under his arm (or on a USB stick ?!) he finally entered Al's Planet Earth studio in Berlindubb to turn the raw material into classic Dub-Cuts to be transformed. Well how should I put it? Let us thank Providence that they are both Dub-Maniacs, because the album “Big Dubb “has become simply superb. Exceptionally beautiful songs, with fine melodies and inspired vocals (some of which flow into the mix), meet an incredibly good band and a breathtakingly full, warm and perfectly balanced sound. Plus a classic, exciting, non-exalted one Dub-Mix who knows how to emphasize the qualities of the original material instead of pushing himself in love with it, and you have an album that is so beautiful that it will undoubtedly prove to be one of the best in the distant future Dub-Albums from German production will be able to maintain.

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Reggae Review

10 Ft. Ganja Plant: "Shake Up The Place"

Who is behind 10 Ft. Ganja Plant? As if it were a real ganja plantation, the actors remain largely anonymous. So much is known: The band started in 2000 as a side project of the band "John Brown's Body", is based in Boston and specializes in the Dub-Sound of the 70s. Now the band presents their seventh album "Shake Up The Place" (Roir) and takes us back to the decade when the Dub bloomed like ripe ganja plants on the plantations. The new work is quite unspectacular and offers - contrary to the title suggests - well-groomed, classic Dubs and vocal tracks (sometimes as a showcase mix), light and airy, hand-played and classically arranged, very pleasant and relaxed. The songs (here you can hear Sylford Walker and Prince Jazzbo among others) are beautifully melodious, some of them pick up on well-known melody fragments and copy the sound of the great vocal harmony trios of Jamaica amazingly perfectly. Choice!

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Review

Rolling Lion Studio: "House Of Dread"

Auf dem Dubmatix label Renegade Recordings has just released the album "House Of Dread" (Renegade) from Rolling Lion Studio. Not much can be found out about the studio other than that it is based in London and produces riddims to order. Since there is probably not much demand for this business, the studio owner probably spends his time producing rhythms for himself, which he has now put on a 12-track album for you to buy out there. I want to encourage you to do this, because the Dubs are consistently solid. The sound can best be described as a modern UKDub describe - but far from militant steppers parade or even house and techno influences. So nothing exciting, but more down-to-earth, good, traditional Dubjust as you like to let it run in the background while working. Focused listening is also possible, but there is little to discover. The tracks work more like daily bass bread - which is what you need to survive. Or as a consolation in an emergency when you have searched the internet for new material in vain. I definitely don't want to miss the “House Of Dead”.

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Review

David Rodigan's Dubwize shower

He struck again: Reggae boss selector David Rodigan! Lately he has been giving himself the honor of putting his selections on CD. After “Real Authentic Reggae Vol. 1 & 2”, he is dedicating his third release on the BBE label, “David Rodigan's Dubwize Shower “(BBE), exclusively, solely and entirely to what is most dear to us: that Dub. When the reggae pope reaches into his record box, the expectations are of course high - in my case they are always so high that the compilation, when it is finally available, can never really fulfill them. Rodigan's task is almost impossible to solve: How should he get out of the ten, if not hundreds of thousands of? Dub-Tracks that have been created since the genre was invented, select the twenty best, most significant, most beautiful and most interesting (which then also have to be approved by the rights holders)? Be it conviction, pedagogical ambition or simply trying to approach the task pragmatically: Rodigan limited himself to classic, Jamaican choices Dub before 1985 (with two exceptions). Undoubtedly an understandable decision, because this is where the roots of the genre lie and these times are fantastic Dub- Works came into being - and last but not least, many of us were created Dubheads actually socialized with the works of King Tubby, Errol Thompson, Augustus Pablos, Sylvian Morris and others. But this is exactly where the problem lies, in my opinion: So important and (for my part) ingenious those in the Dubshower assemblies too - I know them inside out. Labels that are dedicated to reggae history such as Pressure Sounds, Blood & Fire, Trojan etc. have already re-released hundreds of times. Rodigan doesn’t have the rare, unremarkable, exciting one Dub-Going to treasure, but has brought together the great tunes of the genre. Undoubtedly the right means to get the Dubstep kids open their eyes for us Dub-Maniacs, however, that we read this small print column at the end of the riddim, certainly more of a sleeping pill. One more word about the exceptions mentioned above: The first is two tracks from Alborosie's album “Dub Clash ", which we called here a few months ago Dub-Release of the edition celebrated. Albos Rub-a-Dubs fit seamlessly into the historical material of this compilation. The other exception is a "Joker Smoker" reinterpretation by UK producer and Necessarymayhem label owner Da Grynch. Here you can hear clearly how much the world of Dub-Sounds (although "Joker Smoker" is pure rub-a-Dub is) since the exodus of Dub from Jamaica has changed. "Rodigan's Dubwize Shower “is a wonderful museum, a classical concert, maintaining tradition. It is not the foray into the outrageously unheard - for which we Dub actually love so much.

 

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Review

Steve Mason & Dennis Bowell: "Ghost Outside"

For someone with limited musical horizons, who is as allergic to rock as his friends are to reggae, I first had to look up who Steve Mason is. Okay, now I know, he's a Scottish rock musician with close ties to trip hop and folk. Highly praised, enthusiastically celebrated and totally hip. How nice that he with “Ghosts Outside” (Domino), the Dub-Version of his 2010 album "Boys Outside", now draws mainstream attention to our beautiful, small, dear genre. The responsibility for the VerdubHe put the practice into the hands of Dennis Bovell, whereupon this giant man first deleted (almost) everything from the original tracks and replaced them with reggae-skank pianos, reggae shuffle organs, reggae rhythm guitars and of course reggae Has replaced basslines. I can vividly imagine how Mason and Bovell spent hours negotiating how much of the original footage should be left. The result is clearly a reggaeDub-Album, but the origin of a foreign genre can be clearly heard. Apart from Mason's idiosyncratic and latently annoying falsetto singing, which is faded in every now and then, the hybrid of reggae and rock is very harmonious. Despite his supposed radical cure, Bovell went to work with great care and tried to maintain the idiosyncratic melancholy mood of the original work. TripDub you could call it and be remotely reminiscent of Mad Professor's reinterpretation of Massive Attacks "Protection". Yes, that fits.