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dubblog update 2021

2020 wasn't a bad year! At least not for him dubblog, because it has more than doubled the number of its readers compared to previous years. An incredibly motivating success for our small editorial team. That's why we're doing the in 2021 dubblog even better. So from now on there will be a page on which we are all Dub-List new publications (researched by us with self-sacrificing diligence). For you this means: If you want to know what new albums and EPs are in our favorite genre, then in future you will only need this dubVisit blog and click on "New Releases". Of course, we will also discuss outstanding releases in a detailed review.


And another good news for the new year: Den dubblog is now also available in English. It's only a machine translation, but it works - apart from untranslatable puns (we laughed at each other during the tests) - quite well.
But that's not all, because there is one more thing: Helmut Philipps is now part of our editorial team and gives you reviews of albums that we have neglected so far: more historical Dub from Jamaica.


So 2021 can only be good. Stay true to us, write comments - we are happy about each one - and have a dubby new year!

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The dubblog playlists

If you don't want to read, you have to listen: from now on we not only offer reading food but also a feast for the ears. You can now find two exclusive ones at the end of the start page dubblog playlists that we have put together for you.

Our playlist "editor's choice“Offers a weekly review and overview of current events in the Dub-Landscape. With the track selection we want to explore the genre in all its depths, but at the same time offer the subjective best and most up-to-date music selection. But the most important thing: The thing should make you happy and keep one or the other musical discovery ready. Your feedback will show us whether we are right.

The second audio offer is the playlist "deep in dub by dubblog". It comprises 100 tracks and explores the range of our favorite music in a much more extensive and sustainable manner. It is an offshoot of the proven playlist colossus "deep in dub (Extended Version)“, The one with over 4.700 Dub-Tracks of the more recent times, i.e. from the year 2000, comes up and is continuously expanded with new material. Curated by yours truly - Gerhard Thomas Kriz aka gtkriz - you can assume Dub to be served in the classic style. And that, if you want and persevere, for 14 days 24/7 without a single track repetition. The full broadside, so to speak.

For everyone who is more into the glorious Dub-Year in the late 70s and early 80s, here's a tip: Spotify also hosts the playlist "deeper in dub“: Roots Radics, Aggrovators / Revolutionaries / Sly & Robbie, Scientist, Prince Jammy, King Tubby, Joe Gibbs - all the old masters gathered in a single heavyweight Dub-Battle. Enjoy!

It should be noted briefly: The web integration of the two playlists "editors choice" and "deep in dub" at the end of dubblog start page allows - for reasons of copyright - only the playing of 30-second previews. But just one click further you get to the free Spotify web player, which offers you complete listening pleasure. With SongShift there is also a free app that allows you to import Spotify playlists into the streaming service of your choice.

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Various Artists Glitterbeat: Dubs & Versions 1

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The title of the album piqued my curiosity: Glitterbeat: Dubs & Versions (Glitterbeat). World music is after Dub my second great passion - how brilliant when an album promises to combine both. A look at the tracklist turned curiosity into pure greed: Dennis Bovell and Mark Ernestus (Rhythm & Sound) were listed as remixers alongside six other names. So: play! Dennis Bovell's remix of the Malian singer Samba Touré then started. A great, ultra-slow piece, characterized by typical Malian vocal harmonies and underlaid by Bovell with a sluggishly rolling bassline and scattered offbeats. What a start! Mark Ernestus has made an Afrobeat recording of Ben Zabo. No trace of reggae anymore, just a few reverb effects left on Dub think. With his rhythm and sound productions in mind, I had promised myself something else. The next remix comes from Schneider TM, who used the same material as Bovell, but came to an absolutely contrary result. His track is characterized by a strongly syncopated electro sound and distorted vocals. Next track is a remix by Shangaan electro producer Tamala. Like Bovell, he gave the original his favorite beat - in his case, Shangaan. I like this new style from South Africa very much - although it is with me Dub & Versions doesn't have much to do. And another great track: Harmonius Thelonius presents a fusion of fast electronic dance music and Afrobeat. Here, too, the question arises: why under the heading "Dubs & Versions “? We have a paradoxical situation here: I am reviewing an Africa Sounds Remix album because I was told the fraudulent label "Dubs & Versions “- but I think the album is so good that I can't bring myself to delete the lyrics. I want you guys Dub- Enthusiasts out there, so warmly recommend them. It doesn't always have to Dub be - even if it says it.

Rating 4 stars

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Prince Fatty Meets Nostalgia 77: In the Kingdom of Dub

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I keep writing that Dub more than a style, more than a genre, namely a method, a production form, a musical process - but so far I have always failed to provide the ideal proof for this claim. But now my currently favorite has him Dub-Producer, Prince Fatty, without much fanfare, quite unpretentiously, put in the mailbox: Prince Fatty Meets Nostalgia 77: In the Kingdom of Dub (Tru Thoughts). The mixer magician from Brighton did not - as was to be expected - his own (ingenious) retro reggae productionsdubbt, but - what a shock - the jazz tunes of his friend Benedic Lamdin and his project combo Nostalgia 77. In the Kingdom of Dub is a jazz album. Reggae beats are in vain here (although Dennis Brown's unmistakable on the first track Westbound Train-Theme and Dennis Alcapone contributes a few toasts in the second track). Instead there is modern, accessible, even really beautiful jazz. There is actually no reason to be brave and open-minded about this album. But jazz and Dub, can this go well? Is it not a deny itself? Like classical music, jazz is usually understood as a live performance, which should be recorded as pure, unadulterated and authentic as possible. Jazz is fundamentally not “produced” music like pop or reggae. Hence, it is actually a foregone conclusion that Dub - the epitome of “production” - and jazz shouldn't get along. Well, Prince Fatty and Benedic Lamdin prove the opposite in a casual and natural way. The virtuoso game with the sound tracks, the addition of minimal oversdubs (with sounds from the reggae universe) and above all the carefully dosed use of reverb and echo combine with the jazz tunes in such an unbelievably harmonious way that only a few bars are enough to support the thesis of the incompatibility of Dub and let jazz crumble to dust. Dub and jazz become an inseparable unit, groove and mix interpenetrate so organically, as naturally as if they would Dub descended from jazz and not from reggae. The question that remains is whether you can work as a Dub-Lover is ready to trade reggae for jazz for at least ten tracks. So I'll bring another thesis into play: Who Dub like cannot be narrow-minded. And those who are not narrow-minded will find this congenial one Dub-Jazz-Fusion open up the musical horizon even further. And whoever has a broad musical horizon will Kingdom of Dub love.

Rating 4 stars

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Riddim: Dub Conference Special

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In the new edition of the Riddim have Nicolai Beverungen (Echo Beach), Felix Wolter (Dub Visionist), Markus Kammann (Robo Bass HiFi), Thomas Hoppe (Senior Allstars) and me on six pages Dub philosophizes.

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Technical error

Due to a technical error, all posts have been deleted from the blog since December 2013. I have now republished it. Unfortunately, all comments and likes have been lost. External links to the articles no longer work either. Shit happens.

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The Orb Featuring Lee Scratch Perry: Present The Orbserver In The Star House In Dub

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I like to save myself reviews, but on an album like "The Orb Featuring Lee Scratch Perry: Present The Orbserver In The Star House", which was released at the end of last year, you just have to take a stand. Mine read: Lee Perry and The Orb fit together like Planck's law of radiation and Mickey Mouse. In addition: Perry is bad, as usual in the last 30 years. The Orb's electronics, on the other hand, are okay - but unfortunately they have nothing to do with reggae. But now, almost six months later, The Orb are finally doing their thing, because they are part of the presentation "The Orb Featuring Lee Scratch Perry: Present The Orbserver In The Star House In Dub" (Cooking Vinyl) a remixed version of the above album that made Perry shut up on at least 50 percent of the tracks. And on the 11 instrumental versions, which still have nothing to do with reggae, but still - and you can only really hear that now without Perry's torrent of speech - are pretty great. Instead of dull house beats, they offer crazy rhythm constructions, peppered with countless samples from the analog music world. Some tracks are more reminiscent of funk, afrobeat or tricky minimal productions than they serve common house clichés. Actually, the two Orb backers here have something like Dub produced, but cleverly camouflaged it by suppressing the reggae offbeat. And something else is missing: Hall & Echo. But don't worry, that's exactly what the other 12 tracks offer - all remixes of three songs: “Golden Clouds”, “Soulman” and “Ball Of Fire”. Really exciting for Dubheads (with a preference for reggae offbeat) are only four of them, namely those with minimal producer Deadbeat and Dub-Over-Producer Mad Professor sat at the controls. The former sent Perry & The Orb into an echo chamber from which there was apparently no escape. Completely hypnotic, downright mystical, his basic channel minimal beat wafts through time and space, while Perry's vowels, shortened to syllables, seem to echo endlessly. In his “remix”, Mad Professor apparently didn't trust the Orb original at all and put a completely new reggae rhythm under it. I think it's one of his best Dubs become over the last few years.

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Dubstep remix contest with BENGA

To celebrate his new album "Chapter 2" the star is hosting the British Dubstep scene in cooperation with the artist platform Talenthouse organized a remix contest for its fans. Benga invites DJs, remixers and producers from all over the world to play their own spin on the album's first single, entitled 'Forefather feat. Kano 'to give. The original stems will be made available for the competition. Every genre, every style of music is welcome! The winner's remix will be released along with the official remix bundle and promoted on all of Benga's official online channels. This is a huge opportunity for musicians to become known instantly. There is an additional $ 1.000.
If you want to take part in the remix contest with Benga, you have to open your track by May 30, 2013 Talenthouse.com uploaded. The submitted remixes can be voted on in a public vote from May 31st to June 07th. The voting winner wins $ 500 and lots of promotion. Benga herself will determine the winner together with Kano!
More information can be found here: http://bit.ly/10rIwPm

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The Orb Featuring Lee Scratch Perry: Present The Orbserver In The Star House

Lee Perry is a myth. And although - with very few exceptions - he hasn't gotten anything worth mentioning since the late 1970s, his name is still very popular (at least among European and American producers). There are several reasons for this: Perry was undoubtedly one of the most innovative and creative protagonists of reggae in the seventies - but nobody would have been interested if punk had not discovered its weakness for reggae at that time and The Clash had not discovered Perry's “Police and Thieves ”. Since then, the name Lee Perry has been a solid brand in the consciousness of indie rock socialized music fans, which stands for pure (albeit alien) innovative strength. It goes perfectly with the fact that the madness of the eccentric Mr. Perry, which has now lasted around thirty years, is mostly confused with the genius of his early creative period. In addition, Lee Perry is (at least for the target group mentioned above) the inventor of the Dub. And since Dub was known to be the blueprint of remix culture, Lee Perry easily becomes the forefather of modern club music. Against this background, it does not seem surprising that the Lee Perry myth is often instrumentalized by producers and musicians outside the reggae context to enhance their own works. The most recent example of this practice is "The Orb Featuring Lee Scratch Perry Present The Orbserver In The Star House" (Cooking Vinyl / Indigo). Not that The Orb needed to push CD sales with the name Perry, after all, the band, founded by Alex Paterson in 1988, enjoys cult status as the founder of the house subgenre Ambient House. Still, I strongly suspect that Perry's choice was not musically motivated. The electronic orb beats and Perry's sharp, largely melody-free vocals harmonize like apple pie and Tabasco - namely not at all. The Orb (in the incarnation of the duo Alex Patterson and Thomas Fehlmann) approaches the matter just as skilfully as Doubblestandart did two years ago with their album “Return From Planet Dub"By using Perry's" vocals "rather sporadically, like a sample, and giving the music more space - but then Patterson and Fehlmann could have recorded an instrumental album as well. This would not have turned out bad - but then it would have no place in this blog. And that leads us straight to the question, dear readers and friends of reggae, what could be of interest to you about this album? Not much, unless you are also an avid listener of minimal electronics - or really fanatical collectors of Perry material who, for the sake of completeness, also want to incorporate this latest Perry audio document into the collection. If neither is true, then you can safely forget about "The Orbserver In The Star House" and this text and read on with the next review.

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Various: Uno

If you want to finally escape the eternal, repetitive, dull and stupid, almost mindless reggae offbeat, you can lend your ear to the label sampler “Uno” from the Italian label “Aquietbump” to sink into spherical “low end frequencies” . The sound is included somewhere Dub-House / minimal electronics and really isn't bad. Anyone who owns a voluminous subwoofer can easily provoke structural damage (or body damage, depending on) with this album. I even know two of the minimal artists gathered here: Andreas Tilliander and Hieronymus (which doesn't help you now, does it?). It's best to have a listen, because the album is free.