Categories
Review

King Jammy: Waterhouse Dub

Then the King becomes the Prince again: With “Waterhouse Dub" (Greensleeves / VP) King Jammy delivers a flawless one Dub-Album as if the last 30 years of reign hadn't happened. The album is so old school that it seems like it's out of date. It starts with the musical material, which mostly comes from the 1970s and early 1980s (for example Earl Zero's “Please Officer”, Junior Reid's “Shack A Lack Rock” and “Jailhouse”, as well as a new version of Jammy's signature tune “ Jammy's a Shine "). A retro concept that continues pretty seamlessly with mixing: like here, Jammy already had an apprentice to Tubby Dubs mixed. The few more contemporary moments are likely to come from Jammy's sons Jam Two, John John and Baby G, who supported their teacher with the work on the new album. But regardless of whether this approach is considered authentic and only true or hopelessly out of date, the question arises as to why Jammy shows interest in such a project at all and apparently an increased affection for it Dub developed? (As is well known, in 2015 he already played half of the album "Dub of Thrones “(with Alborosie). Where does this new Jamaican appreciation come from Dub come from? The market should not have grown much. With Dub there is no big money to be made. Perhaps the answer lies simply in a new appreciation of the musical qualities of full-fledged (mostly historical) reggae productions. With a few exceptions, some of the acoustic wealth of reggae has fallen by the wayside in recent years. The absolute concentration on singing and voice let the musk behind it become ever simpler, smoother and more reduced, until it finally only served to support the voice, but no longer had any intrinsic value. in the Dub it is the other way around. Here the music counts and the voice fades into the empty room. The typical reggae productions in Jamaica are therefore not convincing Dubs mix more. The music lacks the strength for it. But that could be exactly why a studio veteran like Jammy suddenly feels like it again Dub gets, on its musical complexity, on rough edges and on the aural range of full-fledged productions. And for that we should be grateful to him, buy his album or stream it incessantly and hope that his attitude catches on and initiates a trend reversal in Jamaica. Even if the Dub-Experiments in Europe appeal much more than Jammy's old school, I wholeheartedly wish for a really large, high-quality one Dub-Renaissance in Jamdown. Can I still experience that?


2 replies to “King Jammy: Waterhouse Dub"

Are they actually new Dubs and not old sound-technically polished? I was already unsure about the Alborosie album DoT. First of all Dub-Album Dubclash had old as well as new ones Dubs on it.

Oh, you are so good to me! Friday afternoon shortly (well 2 hours) before the weekend and I'm finished with my fitness to work. No wonder with at least 40 hours a week. (The person responsible for this belongs before the war crimes tribunal, for violating humanity / among other things, the whole Verdi-Looser troop). This beautiful one appears here Dub-Disc screaming for a comment from me.
Above all, I can hardly believe that this disc was played on VP. It has a perfect sound (at home). I also know every riddim and probably already have everything similar (or maybe the same), somewhere on other discs, but I put this one Dub really like to. I don't even know how it works these days. Are there any young people (under 50 ;-)) who like to listen to this music and who also get on with it ?! We old and the older ones have to live with the fact that we somehow already know everything. But should there still continue to be next generations who are not in the mood for "normal music" or only a little, such records are almost a godsend (but still for me). No matter if old or new, Jamaican basslines tear it out again and again and make it unique and unsurpassable. Whenever, while listening to this record, I thought, “Well, this riddim is not one of my top favorites now”, a classic came immediately afterwards that pushed me back to the Olympus of emotions. And if you've actually dozed off a bit, the alarm clock rings every now and then ;-). You can certainly argue about such sound effects ... I don't find it so bad here, or even quite amusing, because it's not exaggerated. In addition, Prince Jammy always knew exactly how to use the sensitive nipples and slides on a mixer so that the magic can unfold to its full potential. And the little sound clash vocal interludes are just charming, lovable and just ORIGINAL ....... quite in contrast to the stupid rumble of the “False Flag Soundsystems” which have caused a sensation in Europe since around the turn of the millennium. Yes, I know there were also good honest soundboys, but most of the people I did to myself were ex-hipopper, who ran out of good hiphop material and thought they'd just play some reggae. The speed and the feeling of the music in general didn't matter to them. Bob Marley was regularly whipped up to Mickey Mouse and they did the same with Sizzla, Capleteon and all the other newcomers. Traitor !!!
Fortunately, this pseudo sound system hype has been over for some time. There are real reggae lovers again who are logically left over and provide warm, passionate feelings. And the Dub discovered them !!!

“With a few exceptions, some of the acoustic wealth of reggae has fallen by the wayside in recent years. The absolute concentration on singing and voice made the music behind it ever simpler, smoother and more reduced, until it finally only served to support the voice, but no longer had any intrinsic value. in the Dub it's the other way around. "

That's exactly the big crux of my life. The cell phone generation, the completely crazy HandyKids, the "The Voice" fans and all those for whom music consists only of text, voice and song are in the majority worldwide. Their lack of criticism and their constant hunger for “new things” mean that music producers no longer bother to care in any way about the sound and the effect of the music as a whole. Pearls for the sows, that's what they call it. I write this down so confidently because that's exactly what an artist admitted in a riddim interview. On top of that, nowadays you don't worry about melodies anymore. Why, since most of them have long since got used to the spoken music. Recently I once again indulged myself in the old Pablo Moses and Peter Tosh discs. What a musical feeling !!! I melted away ……………… .. but I left the latest Pablo Moses disc in the store because it just comes across as limp and uninspired. VP? I also find his “Rebirth” completely boring. Is the time for really good music inspired by JAH over?

Has democracy now officially been abolished in Europe? Are politicians who are peacefully fighting for a cause just locked up here for a long time? Should Kurds get their own state? Is that supported by Europe and especially D-Land? Is it illegal for Catalans to do the same thing? ……………. or am I in the wrong movie now?

Oh yes, this is it Dub-Blog, I shouldn't go too far.

Stop fashism!
Stop killing Woman and Child!
Stop the war!
Stop the dictatorship of money!

Pave The Way RASTA !!!

So much for “Waterhouse Dub“………………………… lemmi

Post a comment

This website uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn more about how your comment data is processed.