Categories
Review Others

Prince Fatty Meets Nostalgia 77: In the Kingdom of Dub

nostalgia77

I keep writing that Dub more than a style, more than a genre, namely a method, a production form, a musical process - but so far I have always failed to provide the ideal proof for this claim. But now my currently favorite has him Dub-Producer, Prince Fatty, without much fanfare, quite unpretentiously, put in the mailbox: Prince Fatty Meets Nostalgia 77: In the Kingdom of Dub (Tru Thoughts). The mixer magician from Brighton did not - as was to be expected - his own (ingenious) retro reggae productionsdubbt, but - what a shock - the jazz tunes of his friend Benedic Lamdin and his project combo Nostalgia 77. In the Kingdom of Dub is a jazz album. Reggae beats are in vain here (although Dennis Brown's unmistakable on the first track Westbound Train-Theme and Dennis Alcapone contributes a few toasts in the second track). Instead there is modern, accessible, even really beautiful jazz. There is actually no reason to be brave and open-minded about this album. But jazz and Dub, can this go well? Is it not a deny itself? Like classical music, jazz is usually understood as a live performance, which should be recorded as pure, unadulterated and authentic as possible. Jazz is fundamentally not “produced” music like pop or reggae. Hence, it is actually a foregone conclusion that Dub - the epitome of “production” - and jazz shouldn't get along. Well, Prince Fatty and Benedic Lamdin prove the opposite in a casual and natural way. The virtuoso game with the sound tracks, the addition of minimal oversdubs (with sounds from the reggae universe) and above all the carefully dosed use of reverb and echo combine with the jazz tunes in such an unbelievably harmonious way that only a few bars are enough to support the thesis of the incompatibility of Dub and let jazz crumble to dust. Dub and jazz become an inseparable unit, groove and mix interpenetrate so organically, as naturally as if they would Dub descended from jazz and not from reggae. The question that remains is whether you can work as a Dub-Lover is ready to trade reggae for jazz for at least ten tracks. So I'll bring another thesis into play: Who Dub like cannot be narrow-minded. And those who are not narrow-minded will find this congenial one Dub-Jazz-Fusion open up the musical horizon even further. And whoever has a broad musical horizon will Kingdom of Dub love.

Rating 4 stars

One reply to “Prince Fatty Meets Nostalgia 77: In the Kingdom of Dub"

" Who Dub like cannot be narrow-minded. And those who are not narrow-minded will find this congenial one Dub-Jazz-Fusion open up the musical horizon even further. And whoever has a broad musical horizon will be the Kingdom of Dub love."

Yeah, I browsed here a bit and from the paragraph quoted I learned a lot about myself. Because I love “Kingdom of Dub" very ;-) !!!

Greetings ……………… .. lemmi

Post a comment

This website uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn more about how your comment data is processed.