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Five Star Reggae Review

Radical Vibration: Abaddown

At Steppers, opinions always differ significantly. However, I am completely open-minded in this regard and really appreciate good steppers. I love sound system nights when the bass bursts over the heads of the dancers like storm surges. Nights when body and rhythm become one. A Dub not be repetitive enough at all. What might sound boring on the sofa is just right in the sound system. Only a few beat-makers have mastered the art, this repetitive, meditative, magical Dubs that work so perfectly in the sound system. One of them resides - not in the UK, but in Geneva: Radikal Vibration. The name is program. The four beat producers and sound system operators Sabu, Son'Ja, Robert Safety & Flegus deliver the ultimate hardcore beats, which they decorate with illustrious vocal artists, or give it to the very best. Last year they released the Brother Culture album, Code Name, from which the hit “Jump Up Pon It” emerged. They just started with "Abaddown“(Evidence Music) a second album with various vocalists like King Kong, Mark Wonder, Micah Shemaiah, Teacha Dee, Wayne Smith, Senham Smith and others - but also with four massive ones Dubs after. I'm deeply impressed by that (the emphasis is on "heavy"). Above all Dubs roar in my ears that it is a relief. I would say: This year's Heavy Bass Prize is going - at the last minute - to Switzerland!

Rating: 5 out of 5.

One reply to "Radical Vibration: Abaddown"

Life is hard sometimes!
I would never have thought it possible that I would consider myself reggae and Dub Fan would feel so "obsolete". I feel downright exhausted and on the siding where meadows and trees have grown all over the place.
I also didn't think that I would say:
Reggae or Dub is always the same! But for me the "Dubs “here almost all of them. I will probably have to repeat it over and over again, but a really good bassline works differently in my opinion. The only one who didn't want to be satisfied with this uniformity was probably the last Mohican in terms of TopRootsReggae that still exists. A man who can still develop melodies and who is seldom or never satisfied with limp riddims. We're talking about Micah Shemaiah !!! Better an old riddim from Jamaica than such limp, untalented riddims with the same bassline.
I really like Brother Culture, but most of the others haven't cracked anything for my taste.
Maybe one or the other brought out a very nice single but against Bob Marley, Peter Tosch, Bunny Wailer,
Burning Spear and LKJ (just so everyone knows what I'm talking about, because the list is much longer) are all sleepyies, if I can put it that way as an old reggae fan. King Kong has never inspired me, not even with Roots Radics or Sly and Robbie. Wayne Smith ... you can recommend a good tune from him if there is one.
Infinite, Exile Di Brave, Mark Wonder are all small fruit flies for me, who once rode a good old riddim here and there but did not advance reggae in any way. Everything is mass instead of class. Where are the artists who got the blessing? There are too many free riders. A very clear positive exception is Micah Shemaiah! I think I'm a fan of him ......
These are sometimes harsh words from me, but the hardcore sound is also harsh to me. When the hardcore Dubscene or whatever you want to call this phenomenon, and want to jump up and down for nights on end, then please, but that's okay for me
dreary.
With all the harsh criticism, I still have to say that I sometimes also like one or the other Dub like to listen to from this direction and even abhotte it. But all night long only one bassline, if only slightly modified at all, does not make a sovereign one for me DubEvent off. In addition, this monotonous bass is then so overwhelmed that it is no longer beneficial.
There are much better ones Dubs from Switzerland !!! ………………… ;-)
I'm sorry René, but as you said in the first sentence, the opinions on steppers differ significantly here ……… ..

Greetings from the Good, the Bad and the Ugly …………… .. lemmi

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